Wins doing TRs

freethinker

Controversial
I'll give you one, but it was completely against standard tech. I used to get headaches all the time. Because I was in Scientology I had to suffer through them, otherwise I would have taken an aspirin.

I was called to a session on end of endless int. I did the session. I then returned to the academy and was asked to do TR0 for 45 minutes. I didn't even think about it and sat down. After 45 minutes, there was a break. I have not had a headache since that day, not once. That was nearly 30 years ago.
 

Veda

Well-known member
I'll give you one, but it was completely against standard tech. I used to get headaches all the time. Because I was in Scientology I had to suffer through them, otherwise I would have taken an aspirin.

I was called to a session on end of endless int. I did the session. I then returned to the academy and was asked to do TR0 for 45 minutes. I didn't even think about it and sat down. After 45 minutes, there was a break. I have not had a headache since that day, not once. That was nearly 30 years ago.
Headaches and Out Int.

Was this chapter from Crowley's Eight Lectures on Yoga a partial inspiration for Hubbard's Int RD?

Do a find on headache to see the quote, if curious:

Link to headache. (Crowley wrote about leaving the body with an astral body and, then, leaving the astral body. A step Hubbard skipped.)

Anyway, my favorite TRs "win" can be seen in this thread: Link to Those who "quit fast" thread. Scroll down if curious.

If course, some don't "quit fast," and hang around:



Perhaps the best known recounting of having an Out of Body Experience while doing Scientology Training Routines - and being sold on Scientology as a result - is from actor Jason Beghe, being interviewed by Mark Bunker.

From 10:45 to 12:37




The vanity compilation of great thinkers, featured in some Scientology PR, and presented at the front of the books Science of Survival and Scientology 8-8008, were put together by book editor John Sanborn to gave Hubbard gravitas (weight and respectability). These were not accurate representations of the sources upon which Hubbard drew. Nonetheless, Hubbard did "borrow" much from a number of subjects and persons - amongst them, and probably topping the list, would be Aleister Crowley.




In his book, Eight Lectures on Yoga, specifically from the section tilted Yoga for Yahoos, Aleister Crowley summarizes Yoga: "Sit still. Stop thinking. Shut up. Get Out!."

This was pretty much Scientology, for a brief while, during the early days, until Hubbard realized it was a terrible business model and introduced the Bridge/hamster wheel to Total Freedom.


The ever-lengthening Grade Chart being introduced


It's pretty obvious that Hubbard did not want people passing through Scientology. He wanted Scientology to possess them.

Breaking the spell of that possession, rather than making a person renounce every tiny piece of the subject, seems to be a valid objective.

Yet, there are those who think that's silly and we should just...



:scratch:
 

Marko Ex

Active member




Is that when you were hooked?
How I got hooked: a buddy gave me a "havingness assist" (Look around here and find something that you can have)
and I, being highly suggestible at that time, had a euphoric realization, or "cog". At that time, I was utterly stressed out, depressed, and had attempted suicide a few months earlier! I was a hot mess, and that taste of euphoria was so dramatically different from the previous 3 years of my life (full of strife and deep suffering), that I just dove in to reading Hubbard, quite uncritically and with a very emotionally misguided hope for further relief from my travail...I was super vulnerable and unstable...
Ironically, when the same guy had talked to me about dianetics a few months before that, I flatly told him it was bullshit!
Oh well...
 

Karakorum

Well-known member
How I got hooked: a buddy gave me a "havingness assist" (Look around here and find something that you can have)
and I, being highly suggestible at that time, had a euphoric realization, or "cog". At that time, I was utterly stressed out, depressed, and had attempted suicide a few months earlier! I was a hot mess, and that taste of euphoria was so dramatically different from the previous 3 years of my life (full of strife and deep suffering), that I just dove in to reading Hubbard, quite uncritically and with a very emotionally misguided hope for further relief from my travail...I was super vulnerable and unstable...
Ironically, when the same guy had talked to me about dianetics a few months before that, I flatly told him it was bullshit!
Oh well...
They like to get people who have problems, whose "ruin" can be quickly found and exploited.
Recruitment and body-routing is a lifeless, sad and creepy job. You end up lookign for vulnerable people or weird focus target groups. Mine were: "Upstat-looking surfers", "edgy girls with tattoos or carrying instruments". :D
 

Marko Ex

Active member
They like to get people who have problems, whose "ruin" can be quickly found and exploited.
Recruitment and body-routing is a lifeless, sad and creepy job. You end up lookign for vulnerable people or weird focus target groups. Mine were: "Upstat-looking surfers", "edgy girls with tattoos or carrying instruments". :D
Yes, scientology/dianutty/Hubbardology is really all about manipulation and ritualised predatory behavior redefined as "help"...It's that creepy, Crowleyian, "I'll-do-what-the-fuck-I-want-to-whomever-whenever" vibe...Hubbard's Affirmations are Ground Zero regarding this unmitigated evil...
 

Karakorum

Well-known member
Yes, scientology/dianutty/Hubbardology is really all about manipulation and ritualised predatory behavior redefined as "help"...It's that creepy, Crowleyian, "I'll-do-what-the-fuck-I-want-to-whomever-whenever" vibe...Hubbard's Affirmations are Ground Zero regarding this unmitigated evil...
Hubbard's affirmations are proof that he was a confused and indoctrinated cult-follower himself at that point in time.
The sad part is that unlike all of us here, he did not just become an ex-cultist and move on. He decided to start his own cult and be a guru.
 

Chuck J.

Election Fraud Has Consequences
Hubbard's affirmations are proof that he was a confused and indoctrinated cult-follower himself at that point in time.
The sad part is that unlike all of us here, he did not just become an ex-cultist and move on. He decided to start his own cult and be a guru.
When I read the affirmations I was struck at how neurotic he was.
 
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Riddick

I clap to no man
The purpose of the TR's was put one in present time. But aren't we all in present time.

The rhetoric by Hubbard was that we weren't in present time because we had engrams, secondaries and locks, and thus needed to do dianetics auditing, and later on scientology auditing, because engrams, secondaries and locks were supposedly whole track or past lives, and removing these things or recalling them from our mind via auditing, we would thus become clear, and then OT..

The rhetoric is to get one to believe one had a engram, or a secondary, or a lock. The rhetoric is to get one to believe by doing auditing and studying everything Hubbard wrote or lectured would make you a clear and then later on a OT, with all the so called abilities of going up the bridge to total freedom.

But, it all turns out to be false, nobody went clear, nobody went OT, and nobody has returned from past life using dianeticss or scientology, not one person.
 

programmer_guy

True ex-Scientologist
The purpose of the TR's was put one in present time. But aren't we all in present time.

The rhetoric by Hubbard was that we weren't in present time because we had engrams, secondaries and locks, and thus needed to do dianetics auditing, and later on scientology auditing, because engrams, secondaries and locks were supposedly whole track or past lives, and removing these things or recalling them from our mind via auditing, we would thus become clear, and then OT..

The rhetoric is to get one to believe one had a engram, or a secondary, or a lock. The rhetoric is to get one to believe by doing auditing and studying everything Hubbard wrote or lectured would make you a clear and then later on a OT, with all the so called abilities of going up the bridge to total freedom.

But, it all turns out to be false, nobody went clear, nobody went OT, and nobody has returned from past life using dianeticss or scientology, not one person.
I partially agree with you and partially disagree with you.

1. It was a combination of Hubbard's rhetoric (pseudo-science explanations) and the creation of brain neuro-transmitter effects in lower-level auditing (especially endorphins). Rhetoric is not required to produce the brain effect in auditing.

2. Yes. I agree that there is no such thing as Clear or OT.

Example, If I told you to go jogging in your neighborhood to feel good and you did it and felt good was that result because of my rhetoric?
 
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Karakorum

Well-known member
When I read the affirmations I was struck at how neurotic he was.
The ex-mormons have a term for such people. They call them POMI:
Physically Out - Mentally In
 

Xenu Xenu Xenu

Well-known member
It was so long ago for me in the cult. I remember thinking that TRs were great, relaxing, and the way and the truth and therapy. I even had an out of body experience doing TRO. That was amazing and everything I could have imagined from Scientology.

As the years went by, I don't think I ever had anything that you could call a win doing TRs. As a matter of fact, things got harder the longer I stayed in Scientology. TRs just made me squirm, and feel uncomfortable. Being a Scientologist, I automatically assumed that the discomfort was proof that the tech worked since Hubbard mentioned such things may happen. And you would be right in thinking that I doubled my efforts to make it all work.

These days I don't even try to "stay in present time". I just live my life like everyone else. If you agree with me, then my rhetoric must be working. We all know it is all rhetoric, don't we?
 

Riddick

I clap to no man
It was so long ago for me in the cult. I remember thinking that TRs were great, relaxing, and the way and the truth and therapy. I even had an out of body experience doing TRO. That was amazing and everything I could have imagined from Scientology.

As the years went by, I don't think I ever had anything that you could call a win doing TRs. As a matter of fact, things got harder the longer I stayed in Scientology. TRs just made me squirm, and feel uncomfortable. Being a Scientologist, I automatically assumed that the discomfort was proof that the tech worked since Hubbard mentioned such things may happen. And you would be right in thinking that I doubled my efforts to make it all work.

These days I don't even try to "stay in present time". I just live my life like everyone else. If you agree with me, then my rhetoric must be working. We all know it is all rhetoric, don't we?
you really don't understand rhetoric, you think it's a one time event like a car salesman trying to sell or persuade you to buy a car.

Dianetics and scientology are a long drawn out rhetoric with it's component parts of rhetoric. I believe the allegory used by many others that have been involved used the slowly boiling a frog in a pot allegory.

"What is boiling frog allegory?
The allegory of "boiled frog" has a widespread usage in history . If a frog is immersed in a pot containing hot water, it would definitely jump out and save its life. However, a frog submerged in a pot containing cold water and temperature raised gradually may fail to notice the rising temperatures ending up being boiled alive."

I think they mean going up the bridge to total freedom is like you are boiled like a frog in cold water. What I mean to say is the same, only saying it was Hubbard's rhetoric that got us to get into the cold water and see what happens. In the end, the journey was not, for nobody went clear or OT. We was boiled and some of us jumped out of the boiling water and are hear to speak.
 

programmer_guy

True ex-Scientologist
I think that TR0-4 were okay (just don't do TR0 for an hour).
I think that the TRs after TR4 are nutty. :D

That's my 2 cents opinion.
 

onceuponatime

Well-known member
I don't think TRs 0-4 are harmful, same with the upper ones. I think doing them a little bit to get the idea of them isn't a bad thing. I don't see the benefit from spending hours and hours (in some cases weeks and weeks) doing them.
 

programmer_guy

True ex-Scientologist
IMO, doing TR0 for an hour can sometimes cause an OBE hallucination.

(And that "experience" is not due to any rhetoric.)
 
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Veda

Well-known member
IMO, doing TR0 for an hour can sometimes cause an OBE hallucination.

(And that "experience" is not due to any rhetoric.)
When the Soviet Union existed they did a lot of work on the topic of unusual sensitivities and capabilities. The Soviets, of course, were absolute materials, and had materialistic explanations. Yet they recognized unusual phenomena as existing.

Quickly dug up some old posts, and threads:

Link to Telepathy, Out Of Body Experience, Precognition thread

And a little more

TRs are always good! TRs are always bad!


Dear Alice
 

Ed8

Active member
Headaches and Out Int.

Was this chapter from Crowley's Eight Lectures on Yoga a partial inspiration for Hubbard's Int RD?

Do a find on headache to see the quote, if curious:

Link to headache. (Crowley wrote about leaving the body with an astral body and, then, leaving the astral body. A step Hubbard skipped.)

Anyway, my favorite TRs "win" can be seen in this thread: Link to Those who "quit fast" thread. Scroll down if curious.

If course, some don't "quit fast," and hang around:



Perhaps the best known recounting of having an Out of Body Experience while doing Scientology Training Routines - and being sold on Scientology as a result - is from actor Jason Beghe, being interviewed by Mark Bunker.

From 10:45 to 12:37




The vanity compilation of great thinkers, featured in some Scientology PR, and presented at the front of the books Science of Survival and Scientology 8-8008, were put together by book editor John Sanborn to gave Hubbard gravitas (weight and respectability). These were not accurate representations of the sources upon which Hubbard drew. Nonetheless, Hubbard did "borrow" much from a number of subjects and persons - amongst them, and probably topping the list, would be Aleister Crowley.




In his book, Eight Lectures on Yoga, specifically from the section tilted Yoga for Yahoos, Aleister Crowley summarizes Yoga: "Sit still. Stop thinking. Shut up. Get Out!."

This was pretty much Scientology, for a brief while, during the early days, until Hubbard realized it was a terrible business model and introduced the Bridge/hamster wheel to Total Freedom.


The ever-lengthening Grade Chart being introduced


It's pretty obvious that Hubbard did not want people passing through Scientology. He wanted Scientology to possess them.

Breaking the spell of that possession, rather than making a person renounce every tiny piece of the subject, seems to be a valid objective.

Yet, there are those who think that's silly and we should just...



:scratch:
Hubbard also borrowed from Helen Rhodes' book Psychcoma. Example from this 1909 classic: "Man is a soul, not has a soul." Sound familiar?
 
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