What's Chuck J. Doing ?

Chuck J.

Election Fraud Has Consequences
....and other stuff. I apologize in advance, felt I needed a thread of my own to post tangential observations and comments that are squirming like a toad in my brain begging to get out. :D


Today: Lunch. Three taco's Dorado con todo. Those are radishes, some lime slices, and sauce for the taco's. Candy for after and a Tecate. I'm not a Tecate fan but it was all he had. It's OK if it's chilled down real good.
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This guy is from Sinaloa so I guess this is estilo Sinaloa. I've become a big fan of comida Oaxaca however, great stuff.
 
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Chuck J.

Election Fraud Has Consequences
San Ysidro - US side, two hundred yards from the border. There are people who actually pay this much monthly. Cray-cray.
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Rosarito. The re-cycler homeless guys are slowly picking this clean. I doubt the steel is much good, it's very rusted. But I guess it can be melted again.
 

Type4_PTS

Well-known member
San Ysidro - US side, two hundred yards from the border. There are people who actually pay this much monthly. Cray-cray.
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Rosarito. The re-cycler homeless guys are slowly picking this clean. I doubt the steel is much good, it's very rusted. But I guess it can be melted again.



I've never been over there but found a way to park for free:
 

Chuck J.

Election Fraud Has Consequences
Driving into Mexico is super easy. At times the customs guys will stand there and watch you drive right through. Truth. Sometimes they'll randomly flag a car down to check. But from what I've seen most of the time you barely have to slow down. Welcome to Mexico! Bring your money!

This applies only to regular vehicles. If you're bringing cargo in a truck or van you have to go thru Aduana / Customs. Which is, of course, a rip-off.

On the other hand driving into the USA from Mexico is a special type of torture.

There are three General Lines so to speak. I'll start with the best.

1. SENTRI - The SENTRI lanes are the RIGHT MOST lanes. Usual wait time peak hours: 20 or 30 min. Non peak maybe 3 minutes. A SENTRI card is a special plastic card you apply for with DHS. You can apply online I think it's $122 now and you need to go to an interview after they do a background check on you. Only problem is getting an appointment to get an interview. All the offices in SoCal are booked up tight. It'll take months, unless you go to a DHS office in say, Douglas, Arizona or some out of the way place. You could probably get an interview there next week.

2. READY LANES - These are in the middle to the left of the SENTRI LANES. These are the lanes you use if you have a plastic Passport Card. It's basically the same thing as your passport but a plastic card. This card is NOT a SENTRI card they are completely different cards. Wait time peak hours: up to an hour or an hour and twenty minutes if it's really heavy. Non peak 20 or 30 minutes.

3. GENERAL LANES - The HELL LANES. All the way to the left. Paper Passport or other documents. I've waited 4 hours and 30 minutes in this lane before I figured out I could use the Ready Lanes. The General Lanes are similar to Dante's 7th Level of Hell. Not for the Faint Of Heart.

It all looks so peaceful and orderly in the pic, right? Nope. It's a F*ck*ng Circus.
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These are all different approaches. i.e. if you're in one of them you can't get out if you make a mistake. Fore-warned is fore-armed.

At peak times all the approaches are backed up hundreds of yards.

Ready Lane Approach: For me to get into the Ready Lanes is tricky. There are a couple badly designed "on-ramp" lanes about 3/4 of a mile before the border but try merging into traffic going 70 mph in 50 feet. Not easy. Luck is involved. You almost have to get on this road miles and miles back. I'm still working on the easiest way to do that.

Sentri Approach: Piece of cake. Super Easy.

General Lanes: Also easy to get to but bumper cars is the name of game. Stress levels will go sky-high if you have to go this way.

Rough Crossing: Five Hours at the Tijuana Border » Whalebone

American Citizen Arrested In Tijuana After Chaotic Chase To San Ysidro Border Crossing
This guy snapped. I'm not joking, the General Lanes will stress you out.


edit:
Moral of my post above: If I can offer one piece of advice to anyone considering going to Mexico, for the day or whatever, at least have a plastic Passport Card so you can go in the Ready Lanes.

Also, do not go in the Sentri Lanes if you do not have a Sentri Card.
 
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Chuck J.

Election Fraud Has Consequences
Since I know about this stuff I'll write about it.

Walking across the border is an entirely different animal than driving. Don't let the media BS you, Mexico is open for business. You can walk right across. Best to have a passport. Because coming back to the US the US customs people will want to see it. You used to be able to just use your drivers license but now if you do that you run at least a 50 / 50 chance of being pulled into secondary for a chat with a supervisor. The customs guy may give you a weird look, tell you to have a passport next time and wave you across because he don't want to deal with calling a supe, etc. But he may not - and you'll have to play dumb with the supervisor. "I didn't know" etc.

OK, going into Mexico. You can catch the bus from San Diego airport I think it's bus 992 or 995 right outside the Delta airlines area. Go to America trolley station, take the blue trolley line. The MTS blue line will take you to San Ysidro station, it's the last one right at the border. You can change some money there for pesos. Usually you'll get a better rate than in Mexico itself. The walkway is a couple hundred yards to the building. Right after it has the sharp left turn is where the US Customs guys like to hide when they're playing Cops & Robbers scoping out bad guys. Cameras are everywhere.
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After you get through the turnstiles into the building stay to the right, there are signs. You'll need to buy a visa, either one week or 180 days. Those are the choices. One week is $7, don't quote me though. 180 days is $32USD (?). Walk around the desk to the right, the lady in the nurse uniform will do the take your temperature Covid Kabuki then walk more to the right and and put your bags into the X-Ray conveyor belt machine. You'll be OK - I've taken auto parts and other weird stuff through and I routinely see guys taking the oddest stuff across. (
Sometimes, rarely you'll be directed to the guys looking in your bags. They do not do that much though. Of the dozens of times I've crossed only twice I've seen that) Grab your bag off the conveyor belt and walk past the two uniformed guys with automatic rifles slung on the their shoulders and out onto the walkway. You're in Mexico. Easy peasy.

Since I live in Mexico I have the 180 day visa. So I walk to the left as I enter the building to cross. The guy or girl will glance at my visa, I flash my US passport also and they wave me across. Sometimes no one is manning the station! True. I've walked right on through. At other times the guy or girl don't even look at your papers. Gotta love it! I do.

Once you're on the walkway out of the building it's a fair bit of a hike over to the out-going turnstiles. If you need a wheelchair there are guys lining the walkway who you can hire to push you. When you come out of the turnstiles, taxi taxi taxi! All the taxi's you'll ever need. Basically 5 USD or 100 pesos to downtown TJ. Outside of "The Plan" it'll be more. For me it's 6 USD to Blvd. Agua Caliente where I catch a collectivo. Anymore than $6 and the taxista is trynna rip you off.

A Collectivo is a shared van that makes regular stops down the road. Like a bus but smaller and much more crowded, lol.

Welcome to Mexico. Spend your money!
 
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Chuck J.

Election Fraud Has Consequences
Chilaquiles con chorizo. Estilo Oaxaca.
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I started digging into it before I remembered to take a pic. I'm not a food blogger but, whatever.

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I just noticed that spike sticking up waiting to impale someone. Don't remember seeing it when I was there, lol. Definitely got to be careful where you step in Mexico.
 

Chuck J.

Election Fraud Has Consequences
Having coffee this morning downtown in the Centro Turistico. This guy and his dog wandered past. I asked him if he had a frisbee and he tried to sell me a paint brush. It was new but I don't need a paint brush. I think he misunderstood. ;-)
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freethinker

Controversial

freethinker

Controversial

Chuck J.

Election Fraud Has Consequences
Step Up: Research Shows You Are Judged By Your Shoes
Step Up: Research Shows You Are Judged By Your Shoes
by Wendy L. Patrick J.D., Ph.D.

Whe
n you go out in public, what do you suppose other people notice about you? Sure, they see your clothing, hair, mannerisms, and certainly your smile. But we tend to underestimate the attention strangers give to one of the most functional aspect of our ensemble—our shoes.
Many people know this, and select footwear accordingly. Others honestly love shoes and have closets full of options. Yet even avid shoe collectors fail to appreciate the consequences of a bad choice. And first impressions are hard to change.

When it comes to footwear there is a balance (sometimes quite literally in the case of women´s heels) of function and fashion. Lest we think such choices go unnoticed, however, research confirms that quite the opposite is true.

Well Grounded: Shoes are Made For Walking
We have all seen women in expensive tailored suits dashing across town wearing running shoes, designer heels stashed in their briefcase until they reach the office. We have seen men who are similarly impeccably dressed—except for their three year old (but certainly comfortable) scuffed loafers. Upon viewing either one of these working professional prototypes, sometimes the shoes become the focal point—often to the exclusion of the rest of the ensemble.

That doesn´t seem fair, you might think, particularly because of the impracticality of sacrificing flash over function during transit. Yet research shows that we often consider exactly that, when judging a person by the shoes they wear most often.

Walk a Mile in My Shoes: Judging Others Based on Shoe Selection
One of the more interesting aspects of shoe research involves the accuracy of some of the conclusions reached. It turns out that when expressing some aspects of our personality, shoes speak louder than words.
In “Shoes as a source of first impressions,” (2012), Gillath et al. explain how in some ways, shoes accurately reflect the personality of the wearer in terms of status, personality and politics.In their study, they had participants provide photographs of the shoes they wore most often, and also self-reported personal information. Study subjects then rated the shoes on a variety of dimensions—some of which correlated with the personal characteristics of the owners. A new group of participants then provided accurate judgments of the shoe owners in terms of income, age, gender, and even attachment anxiety, simply by looking at the photographs.

In their experiment, participants were not shown photographs of special occasion shoes (Cinderella´s glass slippers), but of shoes the owner wore most often. Their study also advised participants not to think too hard, but rather to make judgments based on first impressions. Results revealed some very interesting conclusions.

Specifically, they found that shoe cues accurately transmit information on agreeableness. High top or masculine shoes, for example, conveyed an owner who is less agreeable. Cues also accurately transmit information on openness, and of all things, politics.
There were, however, some areas in which observers defaulted to stereotypes. Perhaps this is to be expected, as Gillath et al. noted that shoes are often the most expensive part of an outfit. Participants viewing well-kept, attractive shoes assumed the owners were more conscientious, contrary to the owner´s self report. So it appears that in some cases we can dress the part and appear to walk the walk.

When the Shoe Fits
In other categories, Gillath et al. found that perceiver judgments were more likely to be accurate. Considering the overall patterns of perception, they concluded that comfort and attractiveness of shoes most accurately reflect the personal characteristics of the wearer.
They also found that study participants could detect attachment anxiety. They speculated this might be because anxious people crave attention and caring, which they might pursue through expressive decoration, selecting shoes designed to make them literally stand out. In contrast, individuals with avoidant attachment who are more aloof and do not care how they are perceived might engage in more indiscriminate shoe selection. Consequently, their shoes would not necessarily reveal their personality.

The Walk Away: Practical Application
The fact that we are analyzed from the ground up may impact the choices we make when completing the perfect outfit. You might reconsider paring a stylish suit with a worn pair of (deliriously comfortable) sneakers. On the other hand, depending on what type of impression you are seeking to make, well-maintained attractive shoes can convey a meticulous image, regardless of accuracy.

Perhaps this research helps explain why we describe a good friend being as comfortable as an old shoe, and why that favorite pair of slippers always feels so good when we get home. The most comfortable setting, of course, is one where we can forget about impression management and put our feet up.


References
Omri Gillath, Angela J. Bahns, Fiona Ge, and Christian S. Crandall, ”Shoes as a source of first impressions,” Journal of Research in Personality 46 (2012): 423-430.

 

Chuck J.

Election Fraud Has Consequences
Movie Review: Logan (2017)

Have you heard of (movie director) James Mangold? I usually don't pay attention much to who is the director of a movie I want to see but I realized he's directed most of the recent (last 5 or 10 years) movies that I've liked. He's good. Very good. Ford vs. Ferrari, Leopold and Kate, Copland, 3:10 to Yuma, and Walk the Line the Johnny Cash movie. He's a multi-talented director, those are all quite different types of films. See the first link at the bottom to an interview with him. That's the one where I realized I liked all his films and took a chance on Logan.

Personally I don't care for the Marvel comics universe / DC superhero movies. But it's popular ($$) Comix nerds love it.

I was puzzled. Mangold has an aesthetic that resonates with me, why on Earth would he do a comix superhero movie? Short answer: He likes to try a wide range of film genres and tries to not be pigeon-holed into one type of movie. I think he succeeds.

So, three years after Logan was released I finally paid some attention to a comix - superhero movie. I DL'd it and watched it.

Mangold turned a dumb genre film into dare I say, if not a work of art, an excellent film about a father / daughter relationship that was secondarily about a guy / mutant with fading super powerz. I'd never heard of Dafne Keen, she's 12 in this movie (2017) Dafne Keen - IMDb) I guess she inherited some acting genes from her father and mother, British actor Will Keen and Spanish actress, author, theater director, Maria Fernandez.

She's silent for the majority of the first half of the film. Logan doesn't even know if she can speak. The scene where she finally speaks to Logan in the truck and erupts in a non-stop blur of fast Spanish is so funny. Hugh Jackman as Logan plays it perfectly. The timing, the surprise, the look on his face, it's classic. And she's got a great "don't mess with me" mean face ;-)

Spoiler: Sort of......it's not a spoiler that Logan dies, everyone knew this was Jackman's last go 'round as Wolverine in these comix spinoff movies. Anyway, the scene where Logan dies and his daughter calls him Daddy is a tear-jerker. I mean that in the best possible way. I cried. A f*ck*ng Marvel comics superhero movie and I was actually crying!

Ms. Keen has some acting skills, it was very well done.

The scenes with Patrick Stewart as Logan's ailing Father are also perfect. If you've ever dealt with an ailing parent it's heart-wrenching to watch those scenes. Art imitating life far too well ;-(

Mangold did it right, this is a film that's way more than what it's advertised as. The hardcore comix nerds got their movie but people who like human interest stories also got a movie too. Which I think is why it was so incredibly popular.

This is a director who if I hear he's done a movie, I'll go see it just based on that. I think he's that good.

HIGHLY recommended!

Here's some interviews:
‘Be Inspired to Try Things, Miracles Happen When Someone Takes a Chance': A Conversation with James Mangold • Cinephilia & Beyond

‘Walk the Line’: How James Mangold Uncovered the Emotional History of Johnny Cash • Cinephilia & Beyond


You’re Gonna Be Redeemed: The Jersey Noir and Western Fable of James Mangold’s ‘Cop Land’ • Cinephilia & Beyond
 

Chuck J.

Election Fraud Has Consequences
Chuck, you have to stop digging those tunnels...under the Border!

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I saw that.

Perfect example of the "quality" of J school grad's - in this case someone named Peter Aitkin.

"The tunnel’s entrance is about three feet north of the border wall but has no exit on the U.S. side of the border, the agency said in a press release."

Really?
A drug smuggling tunnel that has an entrance three feet NORTH of the border?

But has no exit on the US side of the border?

So it's a strictly US side tunnel. Interesting idea. Smuggle something from the US to the......US.

No, Peter, that's not what they said:

Click on the link and the DHS has a clearer explanation of what was going on.
"The tunnel, which has an entrance measuring 12 feet by 10 feet, extends 3 feet north of the international border wall, but has no exit on the U.S. side of the border."

Which would lead someone to believe that the tunnel was perhaps not completed yet.


Journalism School has always been for the kids who can't get into a good school.
 
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D

Deleted member 51

Guest
I saw that.

Perfect example of the "quality" of J school grad's - in this case someone named Peter Aitkin.

"The tunnel’s entrance is about three feet north of the border wall but has no exit on the U.S. side of the border, the agency said in a press release."

Really?
A drug smuggling tunnel that has an entrance three feet NORTH of the border?

But has no exit on the US side of the border?

So it's a strictly US side tunnel. Interesting idea. Smuggle something from the US to the......US.

No, Peter, that's not what they said:

Click on the link and the DHS has a clearer explanation of what was going on.
"The tunnel, which has an entrance measuring 12 feet by 10 feet, extends 3 feet north of the international border wall, but has no exit on the U.S. side of the border."

Which would lead someone to believe that the tunnel was perhaps not completed yet.


Journalism School has always been for the kids who can't get into a good school.
Ah but Sherlock, the tunnel is a "4-foot by 3-foot tunnel nearly 22 feet beneath the ground" with "an entrance measuring 12 feet by 10 feet, extends 3 feet north of the international border wall" It is "183-foot long".

No exit on the US side? :hmm: Pretty odd it would be that long without that worked out. I think they know perfectly well where the tunnel ends up, or is supposed to eventually end up, and are withholding that information.
 
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Chuck J.

Election Fraud Has Consequences
As I mentioned walking or driving into Mexico is super easy.

Driving back into the US can be extremely unpleasant.

Walking back into the US, the subject of this post, can also be less than enjoyable, altho' I'd say not as bad as trying to drive back without knowing some important info. i.e. What the Sentri lane is, what the Ready lane is, how to get on the roads that access each one, etc.

Walking back across, like driving, has some timing issues. You might get lucky. Most of the time no way. Walking you're gonna waste over an hour, easy. If you only spend an hour you were fortunate.

Ok, so you get to the border. La Linea. You'll see a long line. Yup, that's it. Fall in. Be careful about cutting in line. I would not recommend it. You can not beat the crowd by going early a.m. Don't even try. 4 a.m. to 6:30-ish is Prime Time.

I've walked up on it at 7 a.m. on a Friday morning and there were less than 50 people in line and it was way up by the actual gate. I was stunned. Pure luck. Usually the line will be so long it's looped around all the way back to the exit where you come out of the walkway coming back in to Mexico.

Typical line. You can't see it but it curves up around for a couple hundred yards.
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Getting closer. You can almost see the gate into the US walkway that leads to the Border Patrol building.
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You can barely see the gate way up there. Almost there.
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Notice also the short Sentri Lanes. If you have a Sentri Card it's only a 15 minute wait. To the left of those are the Ready Lanes, and then just out of the picture to the far left are the General Lanes where you can typically get a 4 hour wait.

I did not take a pic at the access point where DHS waves you thru into the US walkway. I didn't want to get body-slammed to the concrete for being a terrorist or something.

The thing to understand here is this. If you have a Sentri Card stay to the right and walk all the way past people to the front of the line. The Border Patrol will wave you through like your a Rock Star. Other than that - there is ONE LINE for everybody else. One line unless you have Sentri.

***************
To review:
1. When you drive across there are the Sentri Lanes which is the best / fastest. You have and will need a separate Sentri Card.

2. There are the Ready Lanes which are still OK for driving, most of the time. You have and will need a passport card, which is NOT the same thing as a Sentri Card.

3. Then there are the General Lanes. The Hell Lanes. Over to the far left where everyone is playing bumper cars. You have a typical book type passport, or no passport, or a letter from yer Mom, or 39 cents and a smelly gym sock, or nothing at all.

******************

When you WALK across there are no Ready Lanes even though there are signs saying there are!
If I can impart only one piece of helpful info THAT is it.

If you have a passport card there is no Ready Lane equivalent.

You either have a Sentri Card and walk to the front past the hoi-polloi or you're in the line of the teeming mass of tired, hungry, sleepy, people.

It can be entertaining to watch people walk up on the right without a Sentri Card and get rejected by the Border Patrol. Also watch supposed "handicapped" people try to use it. No dice. One line. And if you just waited 90 minutes you'll be in no mood to let a numbskull pretending to be handicapped get in front of you. So then the dejected walk all. the. way. back. to. the. end. of. the. line.

Another one I've seen is kinda odd. People just walking up to the Border Patrol guys and asking them to let them thru! No papers. Not US citizens, etc.

La Linea, It's a lot of free entertainment.

This pic is past the gate checkpoint into the walkway on the US side. Despite all the bilingual no line cutting signs it's common to see people 'running for the border' in here just to hurry up and wait at the next checkpoint before you get into the building.
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Once you get past that checkpoint. This is what it looks like inside the building where they actually check your passport. Once you get thru this and outside you're in beautiful downtown San Ysidro. Now you can catch the MTS trolley.
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I didn't take this pic. Obviously a promo photo. It's usually filled with people.
 
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Chuck J.

Election Fraud Has Consequences
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This is from the walkway into Mexico looking back at the Blue Line San Ysidro trolley stop. It literally goes right to the border. Or at least the walkway to Mexico. Over to the left is where you come out of the US Border Patrol building when you come back into the US. The small structure in the middle is a Casa de Cambio.

Turn around and this is the walkway to the building to get into Mexico.
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If you ever go to Mexico I hope this helps you orient somewhat.
 
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