The complete 1938 Skipper letter

Barile

Well-known member
oh how I love film noir. Hubbard missed his calling. He could have written something more like this, with edits of course, but it would
have been convincing and all the rage in the early 40's.

Watch the flawless execution here. If only..

 

Veda

Well-known member
oh how I love film noir. Hubbard missed his calling. He could have written something more like this, with edits of course, but it would
have been convincing and all the rage in the early 40's.

Watch the flawless execution here. If only..

Hubbard created his own fan(atic) club, that believed preserving his name and writings, including all his pulp fiction, would guarantee their survival and well being for the next endless trillions.

There is nothing more important in Scientology that the preservation of L. Ron Hubbard's name in perpetuity.

Hubbard "real goal" never changed.

Yes I agree, Hubbard was made for film noir.
 
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Barile

Well-known member
Hubbard created his own fan(atic) club, who believed preserving his name and writings, including all his pulp fiction, would guarantee their survival and well being for the next endless trillions.

There is nothing more important in Scientology that the preservation of L. Ron Hubbard's name in perpetuity.

Hubbard "real goal" never changed.

Yes I agree, Hubbard was made for film noir.
I don't think it would be improper to suggest that we all had a hand in it, in some small way or another, some much more than others. We should not dismiss our own complicity, our own blind enthusiasm, our own lapse of reason. A small lesson worth remembering, for better or for worse. Delusion makes for wonderful moments in film, someone else's consequences staggering on down the street, just a crumpled cigarette pack,
tossed to the ground. Do you hear that sound?

 

Veda

Well-known member
"I have high hopes of smashing my name into history so violently that it it will take a legendary form...
That goal is the real goal as far as I am concerned.
Things which stand too consistently in my way make me nervous.
It's a pretty big job.
In a hundred years Roosevelt will have been forgotten - which gives some idea of the magnitude of my attempt.

And all this boils and froths inside my head."


Scientologists give a standing ovation to the giant L. Ron Hubbard signature.




Happy Hubbard fan(atic) club members gather beneath the giant LRH monogram.

I don't think it would be improper to suggest that we all had a hand in it, in some small way or another, some much more than others. We should not dismiss our own complicity, our own blind enthusiasm, our own lapse of reason. A small lesson worth remembering, for better or for worse. Delusion makes for wonderful moments in film, someone else's consequences staggering on down the street, just a crumpled cigarette pack,
tossed to the ground. Do you hear that sound?


Yes, we were once them, and we were warned fifty years ago and didn't listen.






In Naked Scientology, published in 1971, William Burroughs warned that Scientology came into existence "fundamentally as an ersatz immortality for its founder."

Link to Burroughs' wild ride with Scientology thread


A while back I received a letter from Galaxy Press (Author Services) imploring me to buy a gold leatherette bound copy of Buckskin Brigades, a pulp fiction novel, first published in 1937:




The letter explained that, by purchasing and possessing a copy of Buckskin Brigades, I would be helping to ensure the popularity of L. Ron Hubbard, and thus the preservation and use of the tech, and thus the survival and well being of the human race.

Years earlier, in the Scientology Hotline newsletter, it was announced:

"...the PR positioning of L. Ron Hubbard has been established. 'One of the Most Acclaimed and Widely Read Authors of All Time.' For it is LRH's image on which all the rest of our expansion depends. To the degree that LRH is made the stable terminal in society, people will reach for his books and services and we can get them on the Bridge to Total Freedom."

_______________________



A little more from the 1938 Skipper letter:

_____________________Begin quote_____________________​

Living is a pretty grim joke but a joke just the same. The entire function of man is to survive. Not for 'what' but just to survive... I turned the thing up so it's up to me to survive in a big way. Personal immortality is is only to be gained through printed word, barred note or painted canvas or hard granite.

I seem to have a sort of personal awareness which only begins to come alive when I begin to believe in a destiny. And a strange force stirs in me and I seem to be completely aloof and invincible...

Psychiatrists, reaching the high of the dusty desk, tell us that Alexander and Jenghiz Khan and Napoleon were madmen. I know they're maligning some very intelligent gentlemen...

It's a big joke, this living. God was feeling sardonic the day He created the Universe. So it's rather up to at least one man every few centuries to pop up and come just as close to making him swallow his laughter as possible...

Here's the time at three-thirty and I've got to go downtown. Maybe I shouldn't have written such a letter to you but I just got going and so here it is.

I love you, Skipper, and all will be well.

The Redhead



_________________________End quote________________________
 

La La Lou Lou

Well-known member
"I have high hopes of smashing my name into history so violently that it it will take a legendary form...
That goal is the real goal as far as I am concerned.
Things which stand too consistently in my way make me nervous.
It's a pretty big job.
In a hundred years Roosevelt will have been forgotten - which gives some idea of the magnitude of my attempt.

And all this boils and froths inside my head."


Scientologists give a standing ovation to the giant L. Ron Hubbard signature.




Happy Hubbard fan(atic) club members gather beneath the giant LRH monogram.




Yes, we were once them, and we were warned fifty years ago and didn't listen.






In Naked Scientology, published in 1971, William Burroughs warned that Scientology came into existence "fundamentally as an ersatz immortality for its founder."

Link to Burroughs' wild ride with Scientology thread


A while back I received a letter from Galaxy Press (Author Services) imploring me to buy a gold leatherette bound copy of Buckskin Brigades, a pulp fiction novel, first published in 1937:




The letter explained that, by purchasing and possessing a copy of Buckskin Brigades, I would be helping to ensure the popularity of L. Ron Hubbard, and thus the preservation and use of the tech, and thus the survival and well being of the human race.

Years earlier, in the Scientology Hotline newsletter, it was announced:

"...the PR positioning of L. Ron Hubbard has been established. 'One of the Most Acclaimed and Widely Read Authors of All Time.' For it is LRH's image on which all the rest of our expansion depends. To the degree that LRH is made the stable terminal in society, people will reach for his books and services and we can get them on the Bridge to Total Freedom."

_______________________



A little more from the 1938 Skipper letter:

_____________________Begin quote_____________________​

Living is a pretty grim joke but a joke just the same. The entire function of man is to survive. Not for 'what' but just to survive... I turned the thing up so it's up to me to survive in a big way. Personal immortality is is only to be gained through printed word, barred note or painted canvas or hard granite.

I seem to have a sort of personal awareness which only begins to come alive when I begin to believe in a destiny. And a strange force stirs in me and I seem to be completely aloof and invincible...

Psychiatrists, reaching the high of the dusty desk, tell us that Alexander and Jenghiz Khan and Napoleon were madmen. I know they're maligning some very intelligent gentlemen...

It's a big joke, this living. God was feeling sardonic the day He created the Universe. So it's rather up to at least one man every few centuries to pop up and come just as close to making him swallow his laughter as possible...

Here's the time at three-thirty and I've got to go downtown. Maybe I shouldn't have written such a letter to you but I just got going and so here it is.

I love you, Skipper, and all will be well.


The Redhead



_________________________End quote________________________
So his basic purpose was to piss off the creator...
 

Barile

Well-known member



Yes, we were once them, and we were warned fifty years ago and didn't listen.



well, to be honest... nobody warned me. Remember, I came from NYC and worked for a magazine where Ginsberg was a regular contributor, and I never heard the word until late 1969, when a nightclub owner mentioned that he was getting "power processing" and oooooh it was soooo powerful. Maybe I was too busy reading the I Ching... or too involved in CIA LSD experiments on the general public. Hard to say. Due to the environment and my experiences with the "enlightened ones", perhaps my view of pop culture was dimmed to the point of "fuck pop culture".
If the information was so available, it was not obvious to me, even by 1971... it was the "no internet period", and there was this war going on,
and they were not recruiting guitar players. All I ever heard on the front end was "don't listen to the SP's", which made me wonder where they were, 'cause I hadn't met any. No, I independently came to the conclusion that I was dealing with some real Boolshit and it was being propagated by some members that in real life, I would have never, in a million years, associated myself with. ( any grammar nazi's out there? ) It's easy, I mean real easy, to just conclude "Scientology bad", and nobody, except them, would disagree. I take a more general view that even the most virtuous and socially redeeming activity, when run by people with no quality, real world experience, nothing beyond a basic miseducation, and very little in the way of critical thinking skills or concept of Newton's third law, are given tools to abuse, terrorize and deceive those who have relinquished control of their own destiny to these trustees of the church bake sale. It's real easy for hindsight to kick in when you see the trail of bodies, but how easy is it, to see it coming AND hit the brakes? How easy was it for Stanley Milgram's experimental subjects to realize that even though they were uncomfortable with the idea that they might be killing the "subject" of the experiment, they went ahead and did it anyway, merely because they were very slightly pressured?
For every Hubbard, there are probably, I dunno, what would you guess? A million more? Maybe just with a different skew on the world, different fictions, different cons. You don't hear much about them, until the shit hits the fan, but you do hear the conspiracies, that eventually turn out to be not so conspiratorial after all. We vote for them, we follow them, we pay to see their work, we "demonstrate" in the street at their behest, but the thing is, as a collective, we don't see it coming and we buy in to the pressure of propaganda to just hold course and conform. The problem is not a local problem, it is global. As a society, as a global collective, we fail to understand that passivity permits crimes against humanity, and we assume that because we pay for protection, that someone else isn't paying more to persuade those protectors to take a long lunch.
Hubbard was certainly not the first, and most certainly will not be the last. I'd be more concerned at this point, with the next wave of Boolshit
on the horizon, because ya know, we are all such experts, in detecting boolshit, that it can't possibly happen again.
So I ask again, do you hear that sound?

 

Veda

Well-known member
well, to be honest... nobody warned me. Remember, I came from NYC and worked for a magazine where Ginsberg was a regular contributor, and I never heard the word until late 1969, when a nightclub owner mentioned that he was getting "power processing" and oooooh it was soooo powerful.
Scientology was hip for what, now, seems like a nanosecond

Looking back on it, I know I received warnings that I ignored. Soon after being handed an psychedelic Scientology ticket at an Incredible String Band concert at the Fillmore East in the Lower East Side, in New York, I attended a Summerhill (free school, A.S. Neill) Conference out on Long Island, and mentioned Scientology only to be warned that it was "fascist." Another person said it was "science fiction," but I was impervious to these warnings.

Maybe I was too busy reading the I Ching... or too involved in CIA LSD experiments on the general public. Hard to say. Due to the environment and my experiences with the "enlightened ones", perhaps my view of pop culture was dimmed to the point of "fuck pop culture".
If the information was so available, it was not obvious to me, even by 1971... it was the "no internet period",
There was no internet, but there were public libraries which had archives of magazines, and huge reference books containing lists of magazine articles, many of which a helpful librarian could fetch.

Link to chronology of publications on Scientology

Even today, the warnings on the internet won't reach out and grab somebody by the lapels.

I was one of those people who actually researched Scientology in the Library, and rejected what I found.

All it took was one person who I liked and respected, who spoke favorably of Scientology, to outweigh a stack of magazine articles like this one: Have you ever been a Boo Hoo?

and there was this war going on,
I remember it well.

and they were not recruiting guitar players. All I ever heard on the front end was "don't listen to the SP's", which made me wonder where they were, 'cause I hadn't met any. No, I independently came to the conclusion that I was dealing with some real Boolshit and it was being propagated by some members that in real life, I would have never, in a million years, associated myself with. ( any grammar nazi's out there? ) It's easy, I mean real easy, to just conclude "Scientology bad", and nobody, except them, would disagree. I take a more general view that even the most virtuous and socially redeeming activity, when run by people with no quality, real world experience, nothing beyond a basic miseducation, and very little in the way of critical thinking skills or concept of Newton's third law, are given tools to abuse, terrorize and deceive those who have relinquished control of their own destiny to these trustees of the church bake sale. It's real easy for hindsight to kick in when you see the trail of bodies, but how easy is it, to see it coming AND hit the brakes? How easy was it for Stanley Milgram's experimental subjects to realize that even though they were uncomfortable with the idea that they might be killing the "subject" of the experiment, they went ahead and did it anyway, merely because they were very slightly pressured?
For every Hubbard, there are probably, I dunno, what would you guess? A million more? Maybe just with a different skew on the world, different fictions, different cons. You don't hear much about them, until the shit hits the fan, but you do hear the conspiracies, that eventually turn out to be not so conspiratorial after all. We vote for them, we follow them, we pay to see their work, we "demonstrate" in the street at their behest, but the thing is, as a collective, we don't see it coming and we buy in to the pressure of propaganda to just hold course and conform. The problem is not a local problem, it is global. As a society, as a global collective, we fail to understand that passivity permits crimes against humanity, and we assume that because we pay for protection, that someone else isn't paying more to persuade those protectors to take a long lunch.
Hubbard was certainly not the first, and most certainly will not be the last. I'd be more concerned at this point, with the next wave of Boolshit
on the horizon, because ya know, we are all such experts, in detecting boolshit, that it can't possibly happen again.
So I ask again, do you hear that sound?

IMO, we are in the midst of the next wave of boolshit right now.



This delightful trans-humanist comes attired in an outfit
that is fitting for someone overseeing the implementation of a Global Neo-feudalism.


"The entire function of man is to survive."

So his focus on 'survive' preceded scientology, and did not come as a result of it.
The unpublished Excalibur manuscript is usually considered to be the first expression of Scientology.

SURVIVE!, as opposed to any moral principle, was perfectly suited to the zeitgeist of the period.


That's Friedrich "ubermensch" Nietzsche in the background


Edit: typo
 
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Barile

Well-known member
Then....... clearly, you remember the place at the corner of St. Marks and 2nd Ave where ya got the best chocolate egg cremes, right?
We always called it "Iggy's". Iggy's egg cremes.

so... turns out, it was NEVER called Iggy's.

And to make matters worse...

a freakin' karaoke bar?? uptown? the "Hip East Side"?

Don't you see what's going on here?

 

Chuck J.

Election Fraud Has Consequences
Then....... clearly, you remember the place at the corner of St. Marks and 2nd Ave where ya got the best chocolate egg cremes, right?
We always called it "Iggy's". Iggy's egg cremes.

so... turns out, it was NEVER called Iggy's.

And to make matters worse...

a freakin' karaoke bar?? uptown? the "Hip East Side"?

Don't you see what's going on here?

For me I think it was when the song Purple Haze by Jimi Hendrix was playing in the background of a Porsche TV commercial.

**Jimi's estate is controlled by his non-blood relationstep-sister.
 

Lee #28

Well-known member

Chuck J.

Election Fraud Has Consequences
You might like this Chuck.....

Cool. A piece of history. But time and technology moves on, you could get a better sounding pair of monitors at Best Buy these days. :) Or even some cheapo Berhinger monitors off of Craigslist might actually have better specs than those.

I don't listen to Jimi very often but when I do, so do the neighbors.
 
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