New book: The Significance of Scientology, by Robin Scott

ISNOINews

Independent Scientology and Nation of Islam news
New book: The Significance of Scientology, by Robin Scott.

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF SCIENTOLOGY by Robin Scott - LifeTech Consultants Ltd

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THE SIGNIFICANCE OF SCIENTOLOGY

£18.00

+ £4.50 P+P

The first academically-qualified first-hand intellectual analysis of the applied religious philosophy, Scientology, from someone who played a pivotal role in exposing the abuses of the Church of Scientology, while maintaining a high regard for the workability of the basic technology, fully explained in this book.

Description

Robin Scott was born in London in 1948 to a distinguished intellectual family. He was the top classics scholar of his year at Rugby School in 1962, and graduated from Oxford University in 1970, where he specialised in Religious Philosophy. In 1973 he joined the Church of Scientology’s elite Sea Organisation, and worked full-time for eight years, latterly as a senior executive in the UK and at their international headquarters in Florida. He was ordained as a Minister of Religion in 1976. He has practiced Yoga for thirty years, and was described by GQ magazine as ‘the Cannabis Guru’. In 1983, Robin and his wife Adrienne resigned and became leading critics of the Church of Scientology’s abuses, setting up their own independent centre in Scotland, resulting in many years of litigation, harassment and intimidation from the Church. From 2010 onwards, Robin became active on Facebook, contributing to the ongoing exposures and debates about this controversial subject. This book contains the full story of their relationship with the Church, and his description and conclusions about the workability of Scientology, which he still believes contains many valuable and important techniques.

The inscription on the top of the sword on the front cover reads: "Dedicated to 'Robert the Fox' of Candacraig." On the rest of the blade is a poem called The Phoenix by Astar, the nom de plume of Captain Bill Robertson, the last line of which reads: “And we will go FREE!”

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ISNOINews

Independent Scientology and Nation of Islam news
The reviews on the back cover are YIKES!!! SCARY!!!
Though not on the back cover, Hana Eltringham provided a blurb for the web page for the book.

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF SCIENTOLOGY by Robin Scott - LifeTech Consultants Ltd

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“I loved what you wrote about the Copenhagen caper … I have long wondered how it all really went down and I must say, even so many years later, that I truly admire your “in your face” spirit and determination to do what had to be done!

Thank you also for the good words you included about so many of the truly good, honest and moral people we had the good fortune to work with in Scientology and the Sea Organization – they were truly the best.

Wonderful book, my dear! I am sorry you and Adrienne had those hard years in Scotland and elsewhere … they came to all of us. Much love, Hana”

Commander Hana Eltringham,
Veteran Sea Org Officer, Senior LRH Aide

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La La Lou Lou

Active member
scieTology really is all about ego, isn't it.

It was sold to me as Buddhism for the technical age, but it's all about self and self importance, and so is that book cover.

Sorry Robin Scott, you need to move on, great if you expose some nastiness, the audacity of the AOSHEU lark was amazing, but let go of the teck and discover life.
 

marra

Still standing
I've read it. The first half of the book is a bit nauseating because he's writing it as he felt at the time and he, like most of us in our early days in scientology, considered Hubbard a genius. Later he starts to admit Hubbard had faults but he still believes in the tech.

For me the best part was when the author got a handwriting expert to look at the document which transferred Hubbard's copyrights to RTC. The expert stated that Hubbard's signature was a forgery and the person who did it was the person who notarized the document - David Miscavige.
 

Howard Dickman

New member
This thread may be a good place to record something that I would like known.

First, though, some background.

My name is Howard Dickman and I was staff at the Church of Scientology of San Diego from it's beginnings in February of 1973 to the end of my contract, December 1977. Along the way I did my Product 0 aboard the TSMY Excalibur and spent a year on it's RPF. My highest post at the San Diego Org was Senior C/S.

In 1983 I joined MENSA (the high IQ society), of which I am still a member. In May of 2016, my brother (who was also staff at the Org, after I left) and I attended a birthday party in Las Vegas for several ex-scientologists. I consider my brother's IQ to be higher than mine as he was offered the nuclear program in the U.S. Navy while all I got was the advanced electronics program. At the Las Vegas party we met Amos Jessup, with whom I had been on the RPF with. Amos was my brothers auditor at David Mayo's Center. Both my brother and I feel that Amos was incredibly intelligent. If you have read any ex-scientology books you would know that Amos worked very closely with LRH.

When we were in the Las Vegas hotel room, May 2016, my brother asked Amos what he thought about Ron, to which he replied - "Ron was the smartest man I have ever met."

Amos was an incredible person, who I was honored to be one of his friends. When I heard his reply to my brothers question I knew that Amos was telling us the truth. I will always believe what Amos said about LRH.
 
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Dotey OT

Flat Ball Bearing
This thread may be a good place to record something that I would like known.

First, though, some background.

My name is Howard Dickman and I was staff at the Church of Scientology of San Diego from it's beginnings in February of 1973 to the end of my contract, December 1977. Along the way I did my Product 0 aboard the TSMY Excalibur and spent a year on it's RPF. My highest post at the San Diego Org was Senior C/S.

In 1983 I joined MENSA (the high IQ society), of which I am still a member. In May of 2016, my brother (who was also staff at the Org, after I left) and I attended a birthday party in Las Vegas for several ex-scientologists. I consider my brother's IQ to be higher than mine as he was offered the nuclear program in the U.S. Navy while all I got was the advanced electronics program. At the Las Vegas party we met Amos Jessop, with whom I had been on the RPF with. Amos was my brothers auditor at David Mayo's Center. Both my brother and I feel that Amos was incredibly intelligent. If you have read any ex-scientology books you would know that Amos worked very closely with LRH.

When we were in the Las Vegas hotel room, May 2016, my brother asked Amos what he thought about Ron, to which he replied - "Ron was the smartest man I have ever met."

Amos was an incredible person, who I was honored to be one of his friends. When I heard his reply to my brothers question I knew that Amos was telling us the truth. I will always believe what Amos said about LRH.
Did Amos have anything further to say about "LRH"?
 

Veda

Well-known member
This thread may be a good place to record something that I would like known.

First, though, some background.

My name is Howard Dickman and I was staff at the Church of Scientology of San Diego from it's beginnings in February of 1973 to the end of my contract, December 1977. Along the way I did my Product 0 aboard the TSMY Excalibur and spent a year on it's RPF. My highest post at the San Diego Org was Senior C/S.

In 1983 I joined MENSA (the high IQ society), of which I am still a member. In May of 2016, my brother (who was also staff at the Org, after I left) and I attended a birthday party in Las Vegas for several ex-scientologists. I consider my brother's IQ to be higher than mine as he was offered the nuclear program in the U.S. Navy while all I got was the advanced electronics program. At the Las Vegas party we met Amos Jessup, with whom I had been on the RPF with. Amos was my brothers auditor at David Mayo's Center. Both my brother and I feel that Amos was incredibly intelligent. If you have read any ex-scientology books you would know that Amos worked very closely with LRH.

When we were in the Las Vegas hotel room, May 2016, my brother asked Amos what he thought about Ron, to which he replied - "Ron was the smartest man I have ever met."

Amos was an incredible person, who I was honored to be one of his friends. When I heard his reply to my brothers question I knew that Amos was telling us the truth. I will always believe what Amos said about LRH.
During the early 1970s, there was a conference in New York re. topics of a psi nature. Psi is short for para-physiological or psychic phenomena. Ingo Swann was going to be there so I decided to attend so I'd have a chance to talk with him. But that's another story...

In any event, when I arrived I realized that the event was being held by the MENSA Society and I was surrounded by people who were self consciously aware of their own IQs. Everyone seemed to know their own IQ. It produced an odd tension, particularly between men with a slightly lower IQ than women with a slightly higher IQ.

It was almost a distraction in a comical sort of way.

"Ron was the smartest man I ever met."

Sigh.
 
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Dotey OT

Flat Ball Bearing
During the early 1970s, there was a conference on New York re. topics of a psi nature. Psi is short for para-physiological or psychic phenomena. Ingo Swann was going to be there so I decided to attend so I'd have a chance to talk with him. But that's another story...

In any event, when I arrived I realized that the event was being held by the MENSA Society and I was surrounded by people who were self consciously aware of their own IQs. Everyone seemed to know their own IQ. It produced an odd tension, particularly between men with a slightly lower IQ than women with a slightly higher IQ.

It was almost a distraction in a comical sort of way.

"Ron was the smartest man I ever met."

Sigh.
I have been biting my lip all week. Not much of my lip left, had some fantastically sarcastic posts made up in my head, if you notice that I am trying to regulate that, at least I'm patting myself on the back. What I noticed was that I searched the interwebs about dude here, and saw that MENSA thing pop up in earlier posts elsewhere by Dude, and other writings. I got that, ack. I have been been in the rare air of some really smart guys and gals, through my work and otherwise. I noticed that there wasn't MENSA mentioned around them or by them.
 

Veda

Well-known member
I have been biting my lip all week. Not much of my lip left, had some fantastically sarcastic posts made up in my head, if you notice that I am trying to regulate that, at least I'm patting myself on the back. What I noticed was that I searched the interwebs about dude here, and saw that MENSA thing pop up in earlier posts elsewhere by Dude, and other writings. I got that, ack. I have been been in the rare air of some really smart guys and gals, through my work and otherwise. I noticed that there wasn't MENSA mentioned around them or by them.
After I'd had my exposure to the denizens of the "high IQ society," I looked into it a little more, and discovered that there were people who practiced taking IQ tests so as to get a higher score - I guess to enhance their social life, or self esteem.

Scott's book - or at least its promo - has that "feel."

Just a wee bit too self conscious about being the creme de la creme.
 

Enthetan

Veteran of the Psychic Wars
After I'd had my exposure to the denizens of the "high IQ society," I looked into it a little more, and discovered that there were people who practiced taking IQ tests so as to get a higher score - I guess to enhance their social life, or self esteem.

Scott's book - or at least its promo - has that "feel."

Just a wee bit too self conscious about being the creme de la creme.
I have an IQ well into the Mensa range. I didn't go out of my way to take an IQ test, I just noticed it on my high school transcript, which was in my yearbook.

I have a friend who hosts some Mensa get-togethers, and I sometimes visit, even though I'm not a member. My impression is that a lot of Mensa members, while having high IQs, are often a bit socially dysfunctional.

I have no need to be a Mensa member in order to hang out with smart people. I meet a lot of them every day at work. I regard a number of people here as really smart as well.
 

ILove2Lurk

Lisbeth Salander
Is there a sample chapter I can read? Couldn't find
one online.

I usually run pretty fast in the opposite direction
when I read the words academic, intellectual, and
analysis in one sentence. YMMV. :coolwink:
 

Dotey OT

Flat Ball Bearing
I was a hellion in high school, kinda hated it. I loved to do tests though, I still do. I would have to see the school counselor because my annual testing wouldn't match my grades, which sucked. Was going to high school in a small south Florida beach town. During the 70's. With marijuana bales washing ashore. Still love to do tests, though.
 

KathyCA

Member
“X was the smartest man I ever met” is a statement that can be made for many reasons.
Like a man who loves peanut butter might say about the person who invented peanut butter. Does that mean the inventor is a genius if the statement comes from one?

I think not.

Now, I’m also not going to offer any authoritative opinion on LRH’s IQ or level of genius in general, but I could see how he definitely had a very creative and sinister mind what-with the Mission Earth series and of course the plethora of “non-fiction” collections that he produced. So, maybe he was or maybe he wasn’t but just because Amos Jessup said so, doesn’t make it true.
 

Type4_PTS

Well-known member
When still in high school I went through a battery of tests, including IQ, to help determine what I might be best suited for career-wise.

I did well on the IQ test, scoring in the 99th percentile (within my age group).

Then, just a few years later is when I got involved in Scientology. :duh:

I found out (the hard way) that there are important qualities besides IQ when it comes to making wise decisions in life. :coolwink::D
 

PirateAndBum

Administrator
Staff member
This thread may be a good place to record something that I would like known.

First, though, some background.

My name is Howard Dickman and I was staff at the Church of Scientology of San Diego from it's beginnings in February of 1973 to the end of my contract, December 1977. Along the way I did my Product 0 aboard the TSMY Excalibur and spent a year on it's RPF. My highest post at the San Diego Org was Senior C/S.

In 1983 I joined MENSA (the high IQ society), of which I am still a member. In May of 2016, my brother (who was also staff at the Org, after I left) and I attended a birthday party in Las Vegas for several ex-scientologists. I consider my brother's IQ to be higher than mine as he was offered the nuclear program in the U.S. Navy while all I got was the advanced electronics program. At the Las Vegas party we met Amos Jessup, with whom I had been on the RPF with. Amos was my brothers auditor at David Mayo's Center. Both my brother and I feel that Amos was incredibly intelligent. If you have read any ex-scientology books you would know that Amos worked very closely with LRH.

When we were in the Las Vegas hotel room, May 2016, my brother asked Amos what he thought about Ron, to which he replied - "Ron was the smartest man I have ever met."

Amos was an incredible person, who I was honored to be one of his friends. When I heard his reply to my brothers question I knew that Amos was telling us the truth. I will always believe what Amos said about LRH.
That's why Ron did so well in college I guess.
 

Veda

Well-known member
“X was the smartest man I ever met” is a statement that can be made for many reasons.
Like a man who loves peanut butter might say about the person who invented peanut butter. Does that mean the inventor is a genius if the statement comes from one?

I think not.

Now, I’m also not going to offer any authoritative opinion on LRH’s IQ or level of genius in general, but I could see how he definitely had a very creative and sinister mind what-with the Mission Earth series and of course the plethora of “non-fiction” collections that he produced. So, maybe he was or maybe he wasn’t but just because Amos Jessup said so, doesn’t make it true.
This is not a dig at Amos Jessup who was probably a lovely person.

However, consider the context. Hubbard creates a cult - one consciously modeled after a system of invasive mind control - and then creates a cult, called the Sea Org, within that cult; then he creates a cult called the Rehabilitation Project Force for "Degraded Beings" or "DBs,"and this is a cult inside a cult inside a cult.

Jessup was in the Sea Org and then in the RPF, and he thinks the guy who did that was the smartest man he ever met.

Seems to devalue the meaning of the word "smart."
 
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