Miami chiropractor and Scientology donor Dennis Nobbe charged with COVID relief fraud

Karen#1

Well-known member
Excerpt:
Wow! Another Scientologist chiropractor has been charged by the feds with defrauding Medicare, but also defrauding the PPP loan program intended to bail out small businesses during the COVID crisis. And this time, we know him well. It’s Miami Scientology promoter Dennis Nobbe! Wow! Another Scientologist chiropractor has been charged by the feds with defrauding Medicare, but also defrauding the PPP loan program intended to bail out small businesses during the COVID crisis. And this time, we know him well. It’s Miami Scientology promoter Dennis Nobbe!


 

Type4_PTS

Well-known member
Cross-posted from the comments section over at the Bunker:

John P.an hour ago • edited
1. I wonder if either of the two physician co-conspirators are Scientologists. It appears that both of them turned informant on Nobbe. Scientologists aren't supposed to cooperate with "wog justice," so it'll be interesting to see what the church does. I'm sure being declared is the least of their problems, as the cult could decide that Nobbe could have gotten away with it if they didn't rat him out.

2. I think the odds of a clawback of money given to Scientology, which someone raised in a comment, are low. Relative to the overall value of the fraud, it's probably not worth going after.

3. According to the complaint, "Using Physician 1's Carecredit account, NOBBE induced his patients to apply to be Carecredit cardholders. NOBBE or members of NOBBE'S staff then charged the cardholder's accounts for services that Physician 1 purportedly would provide within the next thirty days, consistent with Carecredit's terms and conditions. ln reality, services were rendered by NOBBE, rather than Physician 1." OK, so far so good. Nobbe is basically using someone else's account to bill for services when he's ineligible to be a provider in that system because his business was too flaky to meet reserve requirements.
But here's where the stupid starts to shine bright: "ln addition, NOBBE generally did not render services within thirty days, and often did not render all of the services for which the cardholders were charged."
What's the first thing you do when you put something on a credit card and the merchant doesn't deliver? You call the card company and dispute the charge. That happens often enough, especially in a short period of time, and the card company is going to pay "Physician 1" a visit, wondering why they don't seem to be delivering the services they're charging for. They might go looking for fraud and report it to Medicare. Or they might just demand that Physician 1 set up a dramatically larger reserve to cover potential chargebacks. If the reserve demanded is greater than the kickback that Physician 1 was receiving, he'd be losing money on the deal and might figure that the jig is up.
A smart crook would want to perpetuate their scheme as long as possible. So they'd make sure that the customers who are paying through this cutout are his happiest customers, so they don't call the card company to complain. But noooo... Nobbe went straight for the full scam as fast as he could go, and it was pretty much inevitable that the bank would let the authorities know. It's especially stupid to try to bilk a specialist payment processor that handles medical charge accounts because they would know right off that something hinky was going on because neurologists don't do chiropractic services like spinal "adjustments." They don't do anything except funny little tests to establish a diagnosis without actually curing anything (this description of the profession comes from a neurologist I knew back in the day).

4. The cutout got about 25% of the gross that Nobbe billed. Nice work if you can get it. I don't know the going rate for money laundering for drug cartels, but this seems excessive. Well, it's excessive unless you factor in the loss of medical license, fines and the lost income for the period of time that you are going to be in jail. But Physician 2 was even cheaper, reaping only about 6% of the money sent to Nobbe as a kickback. That makes me wonder if Physician 2 was a Scientologist, under some pressure to help Nobbe run the scheme. Either that, or Physician 2 was a complete moron as far as valuing his service.

5. Interestingly, they nailed Nobbe for PPP COVID-19 relief fraud because apparently the standard affidavit to get money includes the provision that you are not currently engaged in any criminal activity, but of course he was.

6. Nobbe apparently used some of the skimmed money for payments to Netflix, a carwash, Spotify and a gym membership. Apparently, no Lamborghini, no private jet charters, no fur coats, nothing like that. Just pedestrian expenses you'd think he already had the money to pay for if he were all that successful.

What a putz.
 

Karen#1

Well-known member
Another crook who attested CLEAR, had 3 Ls and had no qualms ripping off the US Government and tax payers.


Dennis Nobbe - Scientology Service Completions

Note: Preliminary analysis suggests that about 60% of people who try Scientology do only a single course or service, that 80% of new members become inactive within 2 years, and that 65% of those who reach the level of Clear become inactive within a year after doing so. The older a list, the more likely that a person listed on it is no longer involved in Scientology.
Please read About These Lists for more information.
Dennis Nobbe in Scientology's Published Service Completion Lists
The following 17 individual completions for Dennis Nobbe appear in official Scientology publications:
Dennis NobbeSTATE OF CLEARSource 631988-09-01
Dennis NobbeSUNSHINE RUNDOWNSource 631988-09-01
Dennis NobbeL 12 RUNDOWNSource 631988-09-01
Dennis NobbeL 11 RUNDOWNSource 651989-02-01
Dennis NobbeL 11 RUNDOWN EXPANDEDSource 651989-02-01
Dennis NobbeL 10 RUNDOWNSource 691989-12-01
Dennis NobbeOT PREPARATIONSSource 851993-01-01
Dennis C. NobbeNEW HUBBARD SOLO AUDITOR COURSE, PART TWOSource 851993-01-01
Dennis NobbeELIGIBILITY FOR ISSUE OF OT LEVELS CHECKSource 851993-01-01
Dennis NobbeNEW OT ISource 851993-01-01
Dennis C. NobbeOT IISource 851993-01-01
Dennis NobbeOT IIISource 851993-01-01
Dennis NobbeNEW OT IV OT DRUG RUNDOWNSource 861993-04-01
Dennis NobbeNEW OT V AUDITED NOTSSource 861993-04-01
Dennis NobbePROSPERITY RUNDOWNSource 861993-04-01
Dennis C. NobbeHUBBARD DIANETICS AUDITOR COURSESource 861993-04-01
Dennis NobbeROUTE TO INFINITY COURSEFreewinds 131994-07-01


Note: The dates listed above are the approximate publication dates of the magazines, which may be weeks or months later than the actual date the service was completed.
Dennis Nobbe in Scientology's Publications
The following 3 mentions of Dennis Nobbe appear in official Scientology publications:
Dennis NobbeFounding PatronsImpact 1092004-09-01
Dennis NobbePatronsImpact 1142006-09-01
Dennis NobbeAll Clears in the United StatesFrom Clear to Eternity Newsletter 20062006-11-01
Note: The dates listed above are the approximate publication dates of the magazines, which may be weeks or months later than the actual date the service was completed.


Dennis Nobbe and WISE Directories
WISE, the World Institute of Scientology Enterprises, publishes directories listing their members.
Dennis Nobbe appears in a recent WISE directory:
2004 WISE Directory:

Category: Chiropractic
Dennis Nobbe
Dynamic Medical Services
8303 Bird Road

Miami, FL 33155-3311
United States
Tel. +1 305-227-1225
Fax +1 305-220-8452
E-Mail: [email protected][provider].com
The information on this page comes from my Scientology Statistics database. While I attempt to be as accurate as possible, errors or inaccuracies may be introduced by the source material, the transcription process, or database bugs. If you discover an error or problem, please let me know by writing to [email protected].
SOURCE :
 

Karen#1

Well-known member
Tony wrote this essay about Dennis Nobbe in 2013:
Excerpt:
Meet Dennis Nobbe, Miami Chiropractor and Scientologist!

By Tony Ortega | May 22, 2013

Dennis_Nobbe3We spoke yesterday with Beatriz Biscardi, the EEOC attorney who filed a lawsuit on May 8 against Dynamic Medical Services, Inc., a Miami chiropractic business run by a Scientologist named Dennis Nobbe.
On May 9, we reported that the EEOC had put out a press release announcing that it was suing Nobbe’s business for forcing his employees to take Scientology courses that had them “screaming at ashtrays or staring at someone for eight hours without moving.”


 
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