Management by Punishment and humiliation

Karen#1

Well-known member
One of the worst traits of Hubbard is much he invented cruel and unusual punishments to *discipline* Sea Org Members
who were already sacrificing their lives

With no days Off
No annual leave
No ability to have children (co-erced abortions)
No freedom of where to be located (even if spouse was 1000s of miles away in another org)
Little to no pay, a pittance
etc etc etc

A later punishment was that the person with bad stats was assigned to the "It's Got Nothing To Do With Me" Club. It was announced to the whole crew in ethics order. Loss of canteen privileges, no libs, reduced pay, lower condition assignments.
Any readers in the forum experience it ?

Humiliation.png
 

Karen#1

Well-known member
Excerpt:
Jan Mortensen CMO Int/WDC/Gold — “Worked in WDC, CMO Int and Gold. We both got assigned to the ‘It’s Got Nothing To Do With Me’ Club for some stupid reason. This is an actual ‘club’ established by an LRH issue with directions of how you get out of the club. You have to do amends, write a 500- (or so) word essay about how your job has nothing to do with you and various other steps. Jan and I worked through the night to get through these steps. Lame.”

 

Karakorum

The most just, the most merciful, the most ethical
No ability to have children (co-erced abortions)
No freedom of where to be located (even if spouse was 1000s of miles away in another org)
Were those two things ordered by Hubbard? All of that was way before my time, but I remember at least a few people mention that Hubbard tried to assure that couples would be based in the same place.

I think Janis Grady in her interview with Jeff Augustine even said that Hubbard would get mad when he heard someone else did it.
 

Enthetan

Veteran of the Psychic Wars
Were those two things ordered by Hubbard? All of that was way before my time, but I remember at least a few people mention that Hubbard tried to assure that couples would be based in the same place.

I think Janis Grady in her interview with Jeff Augustine even said that Hubbard would get mad when he heard someone else did it.
It was a direct and predictable outcome of the system he put in place.

Sea Org members are the property of the Sea Org. They have to go where sent.

Children "distract from production", and are therefore to be strongly discouraged by any executive who hopes to get his stats up this week. Executives who show signs of being "people oriented" (more concerned about their subordinates' well being than with stats) are to be immediately removed (there was an LRH Policy to that effect which I read).

LRH, I think, was concerned with his PR image, and so let others do the dirty work.
 

Karakorum

The most just, the most merciful, the most ethical
It was a direct and predictable outcome of the system he put in place.

Sea Org members are the property of the Sea Org. They have to go where sent.

Children "distract from production", and are therefore to be strongly discouraged by any executive who hopes to get his stats up this week. Executives who show signs of being "people oriented" (more concerned about their subordinates' well being than with stats) are to be immediately removed (there was an LRH Policy to that effect which I read).

LRH, I think, was concerned with his PR image, and so let others do the dirty work.
Perhaps. Again: I feel far less comfortable talking about Hubbard than Dave, because I was not there. I was a baby when the old man kicked the bucket.

All I can do is read and listen to what the people who knew him say. Ron De Wolfe said he drank life a fish and did drugs. Janis says she never seen him do any drugs and that he drank very, very moderately.

Its really hard to get any cohesive image of him. I think the problem is that, like with anything in scientology, people tend to either entirely idolize him or entirely vilify him. There's few people who speak of him in terms of normal human being.

I tend to trust Janis more, because I feel her account is the most down-to-earth of those that I encountered.
 

Chuck J.

Ambassador Plenipotentiary from Bupwupistan
Perhaps. Again: I feel far less comfortable talking about Hubbard than Dave, because I was not there. I was a baby when the old man kicked the bucket.

All I can do is read and listen to what the people who knew him say. Ron De Wolfe said he drank life a fish and did drugs. Janis says she never seen him do any drugs and that he drank very, very moderately.

Its really hard to get any cohesive image of him. I think the problem is that, like with anything in scientology, people tend to either entirely idolize him or entirely vilify him. There's few people who speak of him in terms of normal human being.

I tend to trust Janis more, because I feel her account is the most down-to-earth of those that I encountered.
Here's my down to earth account of meeting Hubbard (several times): His ego was huge. Huge, as in it has it's own gravitational field. Like a Black Hole Star, it sucks in every particle within parsecs (1 parsec = 3.26 light years) With him it was admiration, he fed on it. Which always contrasted / disagreed with his statement in the Code of Honor i.e. Never desire to be liked by another. But he was a bundle of contradictions, he loved the adulation but hated and did not respect yesmen, he enjoyed chatting with me because I just talked to him like a normal person and cracked him up with a joke, and yet in the grand scheme of the cult I was nobody, at least post-wise. He was a weird dude.
 
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