I Think All Anti Ex Scientologists Should Kiss My Grits

I told you I was trouble

Suspended animation.
Grits are made from corn, not oats or wheat. They are mooshier and well, gritty. If they’re not doctored up well, they’re bland and boring. The flavor and texture are something of an acquired taste, IMO.


Lol! That's what I thought they were (well, I knew they were edible) it was the idea of kissing them that threw me ... I assumed you had renamed your derriere.

:D
 
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Lol! That's what I thought they were, it was the idea of kissing them that threw me ... I assumed you had renamed your derriere.

:D
Well, yeh, that’s what the phrase MEANS. You got that right!

It’s a polite replacement word though, don’tcha think? 🤔 It’s less aggro than “Bite me,” stronger than”bugger off,” but doesn’t quite have the punch of “get stuffed.”
 

The_Fixer

Well-known member
Gomer Pyle cooked up a heaping helping for his general one day when he was assigned kitchen duties.
The general wanted hom for his personal chef after that..

Aside from all that, most of Europe refers to it as polenta.
 
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Gomer Pyle cooked up a heaping helping for his general one day when he was assigned kitchen duties.
The general wanted hom for his personal chef after that..
😊 I’ve had both the instant and packaged kind and gagged. 🤢 There are plenty of people who eat that stuff every day, though.

Made from scratch is a whole different story, though, and they’re GREAT! It’s like the difference between an egg and beetroot on a McDonalds burger and making your own. No comparison- it has to be fresh or tastes terrible.

We had a home style restaurant near here that made their own grits from scratch all doctored up and I loved theirs. They have to be slow cooked and soaked overnight to get a nice texture. Their recipe was something like this:

 

Type4_PTS

Well-known member
Gomer Pyle cooked up a heaping helping for his general one day when he was assigned kitchen duties.
The general wanted hom for his personal chef after that..

Aside from all that, most of Europe refers to it as polenta.

I was attempting to find a particular recipe with grits I was aware of. I was unsuccessful but came a different one that looked interesting.
I started to look at the reviews and the first one I came across mentioned polenta. If this reviewer is correct, polenta and grits are not exactly the same thing.

Here's a link to the recipe:

Spicy Shrimp and Grits

And this is the review to which I was referring:

review.jpg
 

Lee #28

Well-known member
I like grits. Southern dish....eaten at breakfast.

Polenta is a bit different in preparation....and considered much more epicurean... Usually eaten at dinner...?
 
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I don’t normally like grits. Just homemade southern style. If you look up recipes for hominy, though, you’ll find dozens.

Grits is more like oatmeal, but with corn instead of oats and chewier/grainier. Grits are made from hominy:


“WHAT IS HOMINY?

Hominy is field corn that has been treated with lye to remove the husky kernel from the outside of the corn. No worries, the lye is washed away.
Hominy can then be ground into GRITS


Hominy is a staple in Mexican dishes so there are lots of recipes. I like it better. I’m going to try this recipe without the sour cream and cheese for my vegetarian niece:


Hominy is supposed to be the healthiest, least fattening form of corn.
 
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I also think that ex-Scientologist websites should be completely tax-deductible since they provide such a huge civic and community benefit and every person who trolls the wonderful ex-Scientologists on such a site should be shamed and booed and canceled from Facebook and Twitter and ordered to receive experimental troll-virus negation vaccination shots with boosters every six months for the rest of their lives and work as a beat police officer on the South Side of Chicago as their amends. :coolwink:

(I’m joking… but not about the wonderful ex-Scientologists here or the huge civic and community service this site provides. It SHOULD be tax deductible!)
 
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I told you I was trouble

Suspended animation.
I also think that ex-Scientologist websites should be completely tax-deductible since they provide such a huge civic and community benefit and every person who trolls the wonderful ex-Scientologists on such a site should be shamed and booed and canceled from Facebook and Twitter and ordered to receive experimental troll-virus negation vaccination shots with boosters every six months and work as a beat police officer on the South Side of Chicago as their amends. :coolwink:

I'd just like to give them a good smack.

:D
 
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I think all those who troll exScientologists who are trying to have conversations in their forums and try to upset them with vicious remarks about needing to go back to the cult that abused them should join a well-meaning religious S&M group and volunteer to be the person getting whipped, stomped, humiliated and abused - signing a billion year contract for $50 or less per week.

Then if the troll escapes, he should be advised that the healthiest thing he could do is return to the religious S&M group and finish his contract.

(Okay, I don’t really wish that for anyone but :wtf: kind of sadistic creep would recommend that kind of thing to survivors of an abusive cult?)
 

JackStraw

Well-known member
Gomer Pyle cooked up a heaping helping for his general one day when he was assigned kitchen duties.
The general wanted hom for his personal chef after that..

Aside from all that, most of Europe refers to it as polenta.
I understand what you're saying, but, I think it's not quite right.
Grits is short for Hominy Grits. Polenta is dried corn, ground to a certain specification. There's corn meal, corn flour, maybe something else. Hominy is corn that has been processed with (I think) lye and is larger (kernels) and paler, whereas polenta is more akin to corn meal or corn flour (unprocessed) ground to a similar or different degree. You can buy
"polenta" at the store or you can buy "corn meal," often at a lower price.
My friend would ask me "What's the difference between "polenta" and "corn meal?" The correct answer was "About $0.50/pound!"
 
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I understand what you're saying, but, I think it's not quite right.
Grits is short for Hominy Grits. Polenta is dried corn, ground to a certain specification. There's corn meal, corn flour, maybe something else. Hominy is corn that has been processed with (I think) lye and is larger (kernels) and paler, whereas polenta is more akin to corn meal or corn flour (unprocessed) ground to a similar or different degree. You can buy
"polenta" at the store or you can buy "corn meal," often at a lower price.
My friend would ask me "What's the difference between "polenta" and "corn meal?" The correct answer was "About $0.50/pound!"
Thanks! You know a lot more about it than me. I just found out exactly what hominy is the other day.

Hominy has that clear, outer part of the corn kernels removed by using lye, which is then rinsed off. It is supposed to taste better and different from regular corn and be highly nutritious. Hominy is not ground if it is bought pre-cooked in a can, which is the only way I’ve seen it yet.

Grits is finely ground Hominy used as a cooked cereal meal.
 

The_Fixer

Well-known member
I understand what you're saying, but, I think it's not quite right.
Grits is short for Hominy Grits. Polenta is dried corn, ground to a certain specification. There's corn meal, corn flour, maybe something else. Hominy is corn that has been processed with (I think) lye and is larger (kernels) and paler, whereas polenta is more akin to corn meal or corn flour (unprocessed) ground to a similar or different degree. You can buy
"polenta" at the store or you can buy "corn meal," often at a lower price.
My friend would ask me "What's the difference between "polenta" and "corn meal?" The correct answer was "About $0.50/pound!"
Thanks, a bit clearer now.
Polenta was the Italian staple before pasta. So I got it a little confused with grits.

So I thought I'd look it up and found :

Few things are as comforting as a bowl of polenta or grits, ideally topped with some delicious, saucy situation, be it pork ragu or sautéed shrimp. But what is the difference between grits and polenta? Is it just that one is a staple of the American South, and the other comes from the land of prosciutto and Parmesan?
Well, no, although country of origin does play a part in the history of the Italian and American iterations of ground corn. Yes, both grits and polenta are made from ground corn, but the main difference here is what type of corn. Polenta, as you can probably guess from the color, is made from yellow corn, while grits are normally made from white corn (or hominy).

This obviously affects the color of both grits and polenta, but more importantly, it affects the texture. Your run-of-the-mill polenta will have a flakier, coarser grind than grits, which leads to a slightly chewier texture. Grits will usually end up being finer and smoother. This is partially due to the type of corn and partially due to the traditional geographical preparation.


Sourced from here.

So in basis, polenta is made from yellow corn and grits comes from white corn. Then come the other differences.
 
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