Former Scientologist: "I've found the holy grail of therapeutic techniques!"

PirateAndBum

Administrator
Staff member
It was a client (ex-scn) of his that made that statement. Bottom line(from watching the vid): Dex is no longer delivering scientology processing. His approach is to handle what the client wants to handle, not propel clients along a "bridge". He's worked out his own methods, synthesizing what he's found beneficial from the works of Hubbard, Alan Walter (Knowledgism), John Galusha (Idenics) and Dennis Stevens (TROM).

I wish Dex well.
 

programmer_guy

Active member
I wish him well in what he is doing and trying to do.

But, IMO, not all problems in life are just the problem of one individual to be addressed in one-on-one talk therapy.

For example, does he do marriage/family therapy with more than one person in front of him?
 

freethinker

Controversial
Does anybody get what he is saying other than describing what might come up in a session?
 

Dex G

Member
I have, on occasion, worked with both parties to address a relationship. Sometimes one party resolutely wants out of the situation, but in any case, whether working with one or both parties, the end result has always been a resolving of misunderstandings and bad feelings toward each other. Much more frequently, I've only had access to one party. It is infrequent that the relationship is a current romantic relationship; often it is parent/child, co-workers, worker/boss, business person and a vendor, etc. I have 3 different techniques, all of which are pertinent to any relationship. One of these is what I call the opposition technique. The very first time I used this was around 2012, with a Scientology client I was taking over from a "standard tech" auditor. In reviewing his PC folders, I saw a great deal of time and money, over a few years, spent on address his supposed "PTS situation with his wife". So in the first session with him we did the opposition technique. It worked extremely well. His next 5 or 6 sessions began with him exclaiming, "I can't believe it, I have no more problems with my wife!". It has always worked ever since.
 

Dex G

Member
It was a client (ex-scn) of his that made that statement. Bottom line(from watching the vid): Dex is no longer delivering scientology processing. His approach is to handle what the client wants to handle, not propel clients along a "bridge". He's worked out his own methods, synthesizing what he's found beneficial from the works of Hubbard, Alan Walter (Knowledgism), John Galusha (Idenics) and Dennis Stevens (TROM).

I wish Dex well.
Thanks P&B, my best to you. Your summation was close enough, but much of my continuing evolution involves creating and revising my techniques through my own inspirations and observations. One lesson I've learned very well: Actual observation and experience must supersede any assumptions, whether internally generated or externally imposed.
 

freethinker

Controversial
Thanks P&B, my best to you. Your summation was close enough, but much of my continuing evolution involves creating and revising my techniques through my own inspirations and observations. One lesson I've learned very well: Actual observation and experience must supersede any assumptions, whether internally generated or externally imposed.
So if you are developing your own techniques, then what do you call what you are doing? It can't be Scientology anymore because standard tech is only what Hubbard came up with or approved of.

What do you call what you do?
 

Dex G

Member
I call it therapeutic spiritual counseling, and while many of my participants have Scientology and Knowledgism backgrounds, I make a point of differentiating from Scientology:


 

Dex G

Member
Do I have to do dating drills?

Yes, that's the kind of mood I'm in.

Sorry, I will go back to work.
Sounds like a question for Match.com :) You're welcome to if it floats your boat, but as for me, e-meters are detrimental to the process, the practitioner should be well enough engaged with the participant to grok what's going on, and not splitting their attention between the participant and the meter, and the participant should not have their self-perception marginalized by looking to a device to know or confirm what's relevant for them, or how they're feeling.
 

Dotey OT

Flat Ball Bearing
Sounds like a question for Match.com :) You're welcome to if it floats your boat, but as for me, e-meters are detrimental to the process, the practitioner should be well enough engaged with the participant to grok what's going on, and not splitting their attention between the participant and the meter, and the participant should not have their self-perception marginalized by looking to a device to know or confirm what's relevant for them, or how they're feeling.
Is that a Maine Coon in your picture? Very pretty!

Speaking only for myself here, sometimes the appearance of someone touting miracles on the message board surprises me. For myself, to use the board as a fishing hole of sorts for the purpose of scaring up some potential customers is a bit problematic, and that may be a magnificent understatement.

You sound as though you are a sincere person, and helping others is, well, a good thing.

Is this what you do for a living?
 

Dex G

Member
Yes, that's my Maine Coon, Bobby, and he says thanks, he is a beautiful animal :)
I saw where my video was posted here, and some kind comments, and so I was moved to join, express my thanks, and clarify what I'm expressing. Yes, this is what I do for a living, I love what I do, this is a passion of mine, and I do enjoy talking about it :)
And fortunately, like learning and practicing playing my bass guitar, there is always the pleasure of growing, learning more, improving on things; perfection is always something we can aspire toward, as long as we recognize that it will always be somewhere in the distance, out of reach, and take satisfaction in making progress :) One of the reasons that things like Scientology are a trap is the indoctrination to submit to the idea that there are no unknowns left to be discovered, that you are not capable of contributing anything meaningful to advance things. The highest level of competence recognized by Scientology (and many other things) is to be able to correctly follow another's instructions. Not exactly empowering or inspiring.
One of the things I put across in training other practitioners is that while they should first learn what I have to share and understand it well, is that I'm expecting them to add their own unique perspectives and inspirations, don't be afraid to change the wordings, and make their own contributions, do things in the ways they find best, and come back to me to share ways to make this better, and thus contribute and teach me things that raise the bar for therapeutic spiritual counseling :)
 
Last edited:

freethinker

Controversial
Do I have to do dating drills?

Yes, that's the kind of mood I'm in.

Sorry, I will go back to work.
Yeah, do you like speed dating or the regular kind?
 

JustSheila

Well-known member
I have, on occasion, worked with both parties to address a relationship. Sometimes one party resolutely wants out of the situation, but in any case, whether working with one or both parties, the end result has always been a resolving of misunderstandings and bad feelings toward each other. Much more frequently, I've only had access to one party. It is infrequent that the relationship is a current romantic relationship; often it is parent/child, co-workers, worker/boss, business person and a vendor, etc. I have 3 different techniques, all of which are pertinent to any relationship. One of these is what I call the opposition technique. The very first time I used this was around 2012, with a Scientology client I was taking over from a "standard tech" auditor. In reviewing his PC folders, I saw a great deal of time and money, over a few years, spent on address his supposed "PTS situation with his wife". So in the first session with him we did the opposition technique. It worked extremely well. His next 5 or 6 sessions began with him exclaiming, "I can't believe it, I have no more problems with my wife!". It has always worked ever since.
Well Dex, I think there can't be enough sincere relationship counselors in today's world. If you're sincerely addressing individuals and their problems and you're not hung up on proving your techniques will work for everyone or involved in any long-term scammy thing where it's always more money needed for the next this or that to resolve the problem, I wish you all sorts of success.

Mediator might be a good title for what you do. Some people see divorce mediators instead of having attorneys work things out and save a lot of money and salvage their relationships, too.
 
I remain extremely cautious about any claims for any type of therapy that doesn't have a lot of scientific validation. Many, many forms of therapy and other practices have been promoted as producing great results or working for everyone and everything in the history of humanity. Many have been revealed to have different results (including bad results in many cases) over time and even abandoned when scrutinized by enough people and in scientific ways involving the effects over time.

Lots and lots of practices can make a small percentage of people feel like they have gotten some gains for a short time right after the practice has been used.

It is much more difficult to find a way to get lasting improvement and a higher percentage of pleased people than a placebo. This gets even more difficult if you want a metric that can be verified. The claim that something has been improved needs something that isn't subjective.

I can't say no one has ever had a therapy and felt it improved their life. So, I don't recommend against every kind of therapy. There are some such as the auditing in Dianetics and Scientology which I definitely recommend against.

It seems like every therapy has some promoter who promises miraculous results.

Therapies that can have such a claim stand up to rigorous scrutiny ? When you find one, please present the evidence.
 

Type4_PTS

Well-known member
I remain extremely cautious about any claims for any type of therapy that doesn't have a lot of scientific validation. Many, many forms of therapy and other practices have been promoted as producing great results or working for everyone and everything in the history of humanity. Many have been revealed to have different results (including bad results in many cases) over time and even abandoned when scrutinized by enough people and in scientific ways involving the effects over time.

Lots and lots of practices can make a small percentage of people feel like they have gotten some gains for a short time right after the practice has been used.

It is much more difficult to find a way to get lasting improvement and a higher percentage of pleased people than a placebo. This gets even more difficult if you want a metric that can be verified. The claim that something has been improved needs something that isn't subjective.

I can't say no one has ever had a therapy and felt it improved their life. So, I don't recommend against every kind of therapy. There are some such as the auditing in Dianetics and Scientology which I definitely recommend against.

It seems like every therapy has some promoter who promises miraculous results.

Therapies that can have such a claim stand up to rigorous scrutiny ? When you find one, please present the evidence.
Under certain circumstances, I would agree with you. If I was suffering from a severe disease (either mental or physical in nature), and there was some type of scientifically validated treatment that could successfully address it and had a strong track record of curing the disease, I would use that treatment (presuming I could afford it).

If the cure rate was very low and/or the therapy took many years to resolve the issue (if it ever did) then I'd begin to search for other options.

Even within the field of medicine, many therapies are used that have not been scientifically validated. This is done in clinical trials, with drugs that are prescribed for off-label purposes, and in other ways.

I know of military veterans who have had severe PTSD, even after decades of traditional treatment from psychologists or psychiatrists.
Some of these began to look elsewhere for solutions and were helped in a dramatic fashion via therapies that are still considered in an experimental stage. EFT (Emotional Freedom Technique), mentioned earlier in this thread is one of those therapies. Another one was ART (Accelerated Resolution Therapy) where the research was done at the University of South Florida.

Years ago, CNN did a special on medical marijuana, documenting a couple whose young child was having hundreds of seizures per week and wasn't responding to any treatment including a dozen medications she tried. If it was your daughter would you just wait until some scientifically validated treatment comes out?

These parents didn't wait. They went to a state (Colorado) where they could legally get medical marijuana for their daughter and it immediately and dramatically helped stop the seizures. Here's a small clip from that CNN documentary:

 
Top