Cult of Scientology hidden secrets flushed out, with data points

Karen#1

Well-known member
This video depicts The story of Bruce Welch on the Apollo. Life on the Apollo, inside stories of the *FLAGSHIP* L-11 is commercial Rundown that resulted from the case history of a madman who went into a full blown mental breakdown.
Because of the danger of having a madman wanting to kill in a confined space, it makes sense that he would be locked in a confined space for the safety of others. But this was then *exported* as a *Rundown* enforced on others who were put in isolation and a copy cat of Bruce Welch is run in "Introspection Rundown: which resulted in the death of Lisa Mcpherson in Clearwater. (Google for story)

There is also a lot of other information INSIDE the CULT. Now you will learn why the cult forces all staff to sign a 2" thick wad of documents that they will *NEVER* disclose what goes on inside. (under pain of huge law suits and $50,000 per violation) Reposted with permission of Jon Atack with whom I did this interview some months ago. Important videos are uploaded on this channel so that they are easily findable in one place.

 

Karen#1

Well-known member
The story of Bruce Welch is one of those incredibles..leading into Introspection Rundown
Its good that Mike Rinder did a full blog post on it a while back.
The video above goes into it a bit more.

 
Last edited:

haiqu

Active member
Did Bruce Welch ever come out of it? Just curious.
 

Veda

Well-known member
Did Bruce Welch ever come out of it? Just curious.
This is David Mayo's account of what happened. Not a word has been changed, but I put it into paragraphs to make it more readable:

__________________________Begin quote____________________________​

...LRH's 'handling' which was brutal and drove the guy more insane/completely insane.

I was either HGC C/S or the FSO C/S. Alan Gilbertson was the XDN C/S who was 'handling' Bruce Welch.

I saw Bill Robertson and tried to get Gilbertson taken off handling him, so I could get him off the ship to his father before it was too late. But LRH blocked that, doing more of his BS EvPurp via Gilbertson. I got some heavy Msg runs for trying to interfere.

Bruce got driven completely crazy--one of the worse instances of Hubbard's madness that I'd ever seen -- up until then. Then Hubbard blamed Gilbertson for screwing Bruce up and demanded that Bill Robertson and I see that Bruce was shipped off to his father (as if that was his idea, not mine). Bruce never recovered and died of dehydration, either because he stopped taking food or drink, or perhaps because he had been so demoralized by Hubbard's and Gilbertson's 'you've got Ev Purps' assertions to a point of irreversible insanity. (My opinion is the latter.)


_______________________________End of quote_______________________________​
 

haiqu

Active member
Bloody hell, eh.
 

Veda

Well-known member
Bloody hell, eh.
Here are some excerpts from the 1976 edition of the "red volumes." It's an HCOB from January 1974. It was around this time that Hubbard made his discoveries regarding rock slams, and instituted the RPF and the RPF's RPF. (Quotes in red. All capitalization in original.)

THE TECHNICAL BREAKTHROUGH OF 1973!
THE INTROSPECTION RD

I have made a technical breakthrough which possibly ranks with the major discoveries of the twentieth century. It is certainly the greatest achievement of 1973 and is now being released after a final write up of the research. It is called the Introspection Rundown.

...

In 1970 the actual cause of PSYCHOSIS was isolated... in the ensuing years this has been proved beyond doubt to be correct.

But what is a psychotic break?

Man has never never been able to solve the psychotic break. In fact, human beings are actually afraid of a person in a psychotic break and in desperation turn to psychiatry to handle.


[Hubbard goes on about psychiatry, ice picks, electric shocks, etc., then...]

THIS MEANS THE LAST REASON TO HAVE PSYCHIATRY AROUND IS GONE.

[Then there are the steps of the RD, and the HCOB ends with...]

THIS PLANET IS OURS.

[Then there's the HCOB of February 1974, titled...]

INTROSPECTION RD
ADDITIONAL STEPS

ISOLATION

In a person with a psychotic break, it is necessary to isolate them for them to de-stimulate...

There comes a point where the C/S must decide to release the person from isolation. To do this the C/S must know if the person can take responsibility for his actions...

The C/S's action is a direct comm line to a person by notes. The person is provided with paper and pen to reply. The C/S must determine the person's responsibility level. Example: "Dear Joe. What can you guarantee me if I let you out of isolation?"... "Dear Joe. I'm sorry but no go on coming out of isolation yet... You must hate the human race quite a bit..."

[Ultimately, the person is supposed to have a cognition, and no longer be a "psycho."]
 

Karen#1

Well-known member
Did Bruce Welch ever come out of it? Just curious.
Did Bruce Welch ever come out of it? Just curious.

I would as a general rule never combat or challenge anything David Mayo said.
He was a man of integrity and honor and mentored me so he became an eternal hero of mine.
But in the case history of studying every morning with Jeff Walker, Flag Interne sup the case history of Bruce Welch, I am reporting that
Bruce did "pop" out of the total breakdown and become lucid and coherent.
At that point He was quickly offloaded and gone and no one ever heard from him again.
I have confirmed this with Janis Gillham Grady.
How long that respite lasted before another relapse of course is unknown.
But in the sequential day to day case history, Bruce returned to normalcy for however brief it was.,
I agree with David Mayo that demanding evil and evil purposes from a fragile case in a mental breakdown
is absurd.
 

haiqu

Active member
I think I met Jeff Walker one time, he came to Sydney with Tours. Pretty impressive guy from memory.
 

haiqu

Active member
Some more data has appeared. It was probably 1977 and it was a reg tour promoting the L's. I have a copy of the event on VHS video tape, one of only two in existence, the other most likely being on some dusty shelf at GOLD. Maybe I should have that converted to a more modern format.

Sorry, I digress. Thanks for your responses guys; there are some events that, from a distance, always bear more scrutiny. Obviously some of it doesn't look to have been such a good idea in retrospect.

Veda, for future reference I have studied the HCOB volumes from cover to cover in one sitting, so am aware of their contents. Which is not saying I can think with them adequately, for I'm not a highly trained auditor, and nor would deign to think myself the equal of a Class XII C/S. We lowly folk in the outer orgs sure were agog at the skills and the presence of visiting firemen, and there always seemed to be a fire going on in the Sea Org in the 70s. I do, however, have a nose for the Data Series and can spot an outpoint for miles, so perhaps I could have been a good one if circumstances were different.

Ah, where's that confounded Bridge?

---

Please
Have you seen the bridge?
I ain't seen the bridge!
Where's that confounded bridge?

The Crunge - Led Zeppelin, Houses of the Holy, 1973
 
Last edited:

Veda

Well-known member
I would as a general rule never combat or challenge anything David Mayo said.
He was a man of integrity and honor and mentored me so he became an eternal hero of mine.
But in the case history of studying every morning with Jeff Walker, Flag Interne sup the case history of Bruce Welch, I am reporting that
Bruce did "pop" out of the total breakdown and become lucid and coherent.
At that point He was quickly offloaded and gone and no one ever heard from him again.
I have confirmed this with Janis Gillham Grady.
How long that respite lasted before another relapse of course is unknown.
But in the sequential day to day case history, Bruce returned to normalcy for however brief it was.,
I agree with David Mayo that demanding evil and evil purposes from a fragile case in a mental breakdown
is absurd.
For the sake of completeness, the previously omitted earlier part of David Mayo's statement from years ago is included in this post.

If I understand correctly, you and another, later, studied the case history, whereas David Mayo was there, on scene, as HGC C/S or FSO C/S.

We know that this, as the Introspection RD, was announced, publicly, by Hubbard, as, "the technical breakthrough of 1973... I have made a technical breakthrough which possibly ranks with the major discoveries of the twentieth century..."

As I understand it, this reflected the earlier excitement by crew on the ship who were told of the great technical breakthrough, by the Commodore, that not only cured psychotic breaks, but also made psychiatry completely obsolete, removing the final barrier to taking the planet.

We know that Hubbard was a highly controlling cult leader who was not above falsifying to enhance either income or his own ego.

We've all seen the 1968 documentary interview where Hubbard stated that he "never had a second wife," and the observation (by a then former crew member) that those present, during this interview, accepted, unquestioningly, any falsehood asserted by Hubbard.

An example of this would be Hubbard's "breakthrough" announcement of 1978, of "Dianetic Clear" - which contradicted what he had stated on the topic for decades prior. It was greeted with great excitement and acceptance. It became, literally, "reality" for Scientologists.

Although it would take ten years for David Mayo to fully recover from the Scientology "spell," to the extent that he could publicly mention Hubbard's willingness to practice deception with regard to the tech, he did mention it in an article on Clear, published by both IVy and Free Spirit magazines. Quote: "It was PR and marketing considerations that led Hubbard to decide that certain people were 'Clear' at a certain point."

Here's the omitted earlier part. As you can see, David Mayo was emphatic about what happened to Bruce Welch (Capitalization in original):

"K obviously does NOT know much at all of the story of Bruce Welsh. And she praised Hubbard for his wonderful handling. As to how he was handled she is completely false. She praises LRH's handling which was brutal and drove the guy more insane/completely insane..."

The above was originally not included as it is many years old, and some views have changed, and it, unavoidably, is somewhat personal, and emotional.

It is included, now, for the sake of completeness on this important topic.
 

Karen#1

Well-known member
That's a good find Lee.
Excerpt from Memorial above


When Bruce was 2 his family moved to Dixfield, ME where he lived until he his family moved to England in 1960. In 1962 he attended Kents Hill school in Maine where he continued his scholastic ways. He proved his genius when he scored a perfect 1600 on his SATs. He attended RPI in Troy, NY for a couple years, but dropped out and joined the Air Force. Bruce spent one tour of duty in Vietnam in 1966/67, and eventually mustered out in 1968. He dabbled in Scientology with his dad and sister throughout the 70s and served on L. Ron Hubbard's ship. He worked for many years in the manufacture of computer chips in Portland, ME. While in his 50s he finally got his computer science degree from the University of Maine. For several years he worked with his brother in law running all the computers in a tax business. He retired to New Mexico at his dad's place where he spent his last years.

So he even got a Computer Science degree subsequently.
He certainly did come out of it :)
 

Veda

Well-known member
I guess that demolishes Veda's "Bruce never recovered and died of dehydration ..." narrative.
It wasn't my narrative. I was relaying David Mayo's words which were written years after Bruce Welch died at age 62.

According to the account, he retired, in his fifties, to his dad's place, where he spent his last years.

The details are none of our business, and we don't know, by his obituary, if this person was struggling.
 
Last edited:

Veda

Well-known member
This looks like our Bruce Welch. Looks like he made out ok afterwards: Norman Bruce Welch (1945-2008) - Find A Grave...
David Mayo didn't state that Welch died immediately or was institutionalized. He seemed to have some line of information re. Welch's later life, and was aware of his death, but, at the time, it didn't occur to me to ask him further about it.

He was sent to his father from the ship.

We don't know why he died at his father's place at age 62.
 

PirateAndBum

Administrator
Staff member
for future reference I have studied the HCOB volumes from cover to cover in one sitting, so am aware of their contents
Ah, no, you didn't "study" the tech volumes cover to cover in one sitting. You might have skimmed through them, but it is NOT possible to "study" that many pages in one sitting.
 

haiqu

Active member
Ah, no, you didn't "study" the tech volumes cover to cover in one sitting. You might have skimmed through them, but it is NOT possible to "study" that many pages in one sitting.
I did sleep, you know. But they were read consecutively from end to end. As distinct from occasionally looking up a bulletin, which is how they're mostly utilized.

Edit: If you require further proof, read this message on the old ESMB. It was a repeat of, and slight revision to, a message I posted to the alt.religion.scientology newsgroup on 19 Nov 2001.

 
Last edited:

haiqu

Active member
David Mayo didn't state that Welch died immediately or was institutionalized. He seemed to have some line of information re. Welch's later life, and was aware of his death, but, at the time, it didn't occur to me to ask him further about it.

He was sent to his father from the ship.

We don't know why he died at his father's place at age 62.
Yeah, so he was shipped out some time in the early 70's and died in 2008 of causes unknown.

Outpoint: Omitted time.

Apparently his family was also in good shape, since they included the data that he was a Scientologist in his profile.

I call bullshit on the Mayo story.
 
Last edited:

Veda

Well-known member
Yeah, so he was shipped out some time in the early 70's and died in 2008 of causes unknown.

Outpoint: Omitted time.

Apparently his family was also in good shape, since they included the data that he was a Scientologist in his profile.

I call bullshit on the Mayo story.
I get it that you don't like David Mayo. He committed the unforgivable sin of saying that Hubbard was primarily motivated by a craving for personal - Earthly - power, and a craving for money, and that Hubbard was willing to corrupt the "tech."

The desire to cover for Hubbard and his "tech," even in those who have been "out" for years, can be strong.

You've been out for years, yet you use cult terminology, such as "outpoint," as though it's normal everyday vernacular.

There's a lot that's unknown.

There are several parts to this: The person was abused on the ship by Hubbard, and by his "tech"; he was sent off the ship to his father; after a while, he had a job working for a company that manufactued computer chips; later in life he went back to college to get a degree; and then worked with his brother in law for a few years; then he stopped working in his fifties and died, at age 62, at his father's place.

As for witnesses named by Mayo, there are Bill Robertson, and someone named Gilbertson.

Bill Robertson went on to start Ron's Orgs, decided he was Astar Paramejgian, Deputy Sector Commander, under Elron Elray (L. Ron Hubbard), of Sector 9 of the galaxy, and then died of cancer in his early fifties.



This period of time seems to have been particularly unpleasant. Hubbard had returned to the ship from his hide out in Queens, New York, having been wanted for fraud in France - for which he was, years later, convicted in absentia.



The Rehabilitation Project Force was created, and hunting for a particular e-meter reaction called "Rock Slams," which, supposedly, meant that a person had "Evil Purposes," became an passion and, worse, it became "tech."

Hubbard had a motorcycle accident with mostly superficial but very unpleasant injures.

Someone had the idea of boosting the Commodore's morale by bringing out, and dusting off, an old missive by Hubbard, from almost twenty years earlier, written on a drunken lark (according to John Sanborn, who was there), late one night during the 1950s, and then filed away. It was called the Hymn of Asia and Scientologists swooned over it when, in 1974, it was finally published in a fancy hardbound book. A series of Advance! magazine covers appeared with Hubbard featured as the returned Buddha.





I don't know what happened to Bruce Welch and neither do you. We have other people's accounts. We have Hubbard's writings during that period. We have the patterns that are part of Scientology.

How did a person who signed a billion year contract, joined the Sea Org, and traveled to the secret "flagship," only to become the "psycho" upon whom the "Commodore" made his much celebrated "breakthrough" of 1973, fare later in life? Neither of us really know. But judging by what information is available, and by consistent patterns, it would have been difficult, despite the not unusual "on the bright side" obituary.

One thing we do know. Scientology only became nastier as the 1970s progressed. The RPF, the RPF's RPF, the Children's RPF, the continued dark cloak and dagger activities, including attacks on private citizens, directed by Hubbard, the Sweat Program for "LSD zombies," the Jokers and Degraders bulletin, Project Normandy in Florida, the suicide of Quentin Hubbard - it just kept spiraling down.

Each person can decide for himself.
 
Top