Chris Dunn evidence of advanced technology in Egypt

mimsey borogrove

Well-known member
This is perhaps the most interesting presentation of the theory behind the Giza pyramid I have ever heard. Chris gives this lecture some time after his first book, the Giza Power Plant and his second one on the Lost Egyptian Technology. I am paraphrasing but he says the technology of the people who built the pyramids was based on acoustics, and non-linear acoustics. For instance - the brain resonates at 6 hertz, and the pyramid's is between 6 and 9 hertz. But why is this important? It has to do with unifying the left brain, the right brain, and bringing a state of harmony. If you start around 7 minutes he discusses what the civilization was like and what they were achieving with this mastery of acoustic technology.

 

mimsey borogrove

Well-known member
A discussion of the younger dryas catastrophe, that morphs into Ben's trip to Egypt. Randell shows evidence of massive floods in Egypt, then they go into Ben's trip to Egypt in Nov. and show some video of some of the astounding sites that have been recently opened - some have been closed for 50 years.

 
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mimsey borogrove

Well-known member
In this lecture Chris goes into his work researching the technology of Egypt - In the beginning is a wonderful break down of the layout of Ramses' head. He demonstrates how the head is laid out on a grid based on the Pythagorean triangle, how all the radius's of the facial features align with points on the grid, the uniformity of the opposite sides. Quite obviously- the makers didn't pick up tools an start wacking away - this was precisely crafted.



 

Barile

Active member
I'm a fan of C. Dunn and I do watch and wonder at the ridiculous feats of construction of the old world. I was watching some Russian guy on youtube drill a hole in granite with a copper tube and an assymetrical tree branch and some ground up stuff as a cutting agent. It actually was fairly convincing and left the same signature as seen on the core samples of much discussion. The thing is ... I wonder why they only built with stone. Why not something a bit more advanced. Concrete or some moldable mixture. Why not carbon fiber? Why not steel and glass? If they were advanced and had some techniques we don't realize at this point, it seems to me there should be something that is really out of place in terms of materials. The "how" is a huge question, but it would be like modern man building spacecraft out of cast iron. Something seems ass backwards to me. We should be asking why an advanced ancient civilization didn't come up with better materials in the first place if they were so advanced? Liike dude... let's move that island closer to shore so we don't have to invent bridges... and they do.
There's probably a good explanation...
 

mimsey borogrove

Well-known member
There is actually, and that has to do with A) the lack of permanence of a lot of construction materials. Look at the Titanic for instance, it's mostly rusted away. In a few decades all that will be left are items made from porcelain and other non-water solubles littering the bottom.

Then B), where do people typically build? Close to water. The sea level has risen 300 ft in 12K years, so any remnants of cities would be buried under a lot of water, silt etc. If you look at the underwater continental shelf of the United States, and imagine it was once the shoreline - has anybody searched for cities there? It is known that there are several drowned cities, such as in the Mediterranean, off the coast of India, Japan, and in the Atlantic.

C) there's been a lot of robbing building materials for other projects. Many buildings were built from stone taken from the pyramids for example.

D) Let's assume, Chris and others are correct - there was an advanced civilization 12K years ago. Well, what happened to it? There are 4 main theories I know of - 1) the Velokovski theory - a close encounter with a another planet, which would cause massive flooding from the tides, vulcanism, lightning etc. The Thunderbolts project has a lot about that.

2) The comet strike on the Laurentide at the Younger Dryas, which killed most north American animals weighing over 100 lbs, massive ice boulders blown into suborbital trajectories, resulting in the Carolina bays. The huge amount of water vapor blown high into the atmosphere would block off the sun light, chilling the planet, and ice falling in the north Atlantic and Artic seas would upset the gyre and screw up the gulf stream.

3) The micro-nova theory which posits the sun micro nova's every 12k years - the Suspicious Observers web site has a lot of data about that.

4) the continental shift theory where the crust rotates over the molten core. So Siberia moves from a temperate zone, to where it is now, encasing mammoths in ice caused by the nuke winter resulting from all the attendant vulcanism etc.

We don't know for sure which is correct, or if they occurred in succession or combination. It is obvious something happened.

If a global catastrophe of those levels occurred, any manufacturing of a large scale would cease, and metals etc. would be sought out, and turned into plowshares etc. when our ancestors found themselves back in the stone age.

Does that help?

Mimsey
 
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Barile

Active member
<snip>

Does that help?

Mimsey
Well, I've seen/read/watched each of the topics you mention. There is plausiblity in each, but I don't rule out completely the implausible.
Occam's razor be damned, because having that kind of forethought/longview does not seem to be what we humans do best at all. But as you say,
"It is obvious something happened."
Don't know if you've seen this,


but it's a short explanation that seems plausible to me, if we want to talk about 4.5 billion years ago. If true, gotta wonder about pre 4.5 billion years.
 

mimsey borogrove

Well-known member
Well, I've seen/read/watched each of the topics you mention. There is plausiblity in each, but I don't rule out completely the implausible.
Occam's razor be damned, because having that kind of forethought/longview does not seem to be what we humans do best at all. But as you say,
"It is obvious something happened."
Don't know if you've seen this,


but it's a short explanation that seems plausible to me, if we want to talk about 4.5 billion years ago. If true, gotta wonder about pre 4.5 billion years.
I saw that one. I first got on this trail with the book "when the sky fell" which was about the Charles Hapgood theory. There's so much we don't know about our history, such as the lost cities in the south america that are showing up on lidar, or the ones in Africa under the sand, the within thousandths of an inch Egyptian artifacts, it is truly amazing they hold on to theories that there was no previous advanced civilization.

Mimsey


 

Barile

Active member
frustrating isn't it? on the surface, you would think past civilizations had some pretty good reasons to build things to last thousands of years, but where did they go? If you subscribe to the ancient astronaut theory... where'd they go? If you chalk it up to solar flares on a very long schedule...
and, if that's coming up next week, that will never play in the news media, so most will be caught with their pants down and a few will try hiding in bunkers and eventually make it back to hunting and gathering.
the simulation theory is looking better to me all the time. time is not how we apparently experience it, history is not chronological, events are randomly generated. A little like the current state of World of Warcraft. If it is like an MMORPG, it will suck when the next patch comes out and you have to level a new character that is more OP than your stupid rogue or paladin.
Here's my best guess... always play a mage. You can always switch from frost to fire to arcane, depending on the wind direction, and you can always teleport somewhere safe in just a few seconds. I'm goin' with that, because the alternate explanations that seem more plausible suggest that Dante was right about everything.
 

Chuck J.

INTJ
I'm a killjoy.

This explanation puts ten thousand past, present and future authors out of work and kills the cottage industry of pyramid books, TV shows and movies. Well, it wont put them out of work they'll still write nonsense - but it'll show how absurd it all is.

No Aliens.
No lasers.
No sonic cutting tools.
No "advanced" technology, alien or ancient Egyptian.
No levitation of gigantic blocks from the quarry xx miles away.
No armies of slaves hauling gigantic blocks. On rollers or otherwise.
No floating of gigantic blocks on barges.
No huge earthen ramps to haul gigantic blocks up higher as the pyramid was built.
No gigantic blocks at all.

Ok, ready?
Here's the big secret.

It was a pour.
It's man-made "cement" poured into simple wooden forms. Maybe better described as man-made rock. Pour the stone, let it dry. Next!

Sorry.
No need for all the ridiculous far-fetched explanations. Occam's Razor and all that. Sure kills the mystery.... and paperback book sales, lol.

The only advanced technology involved is that the Ancient Egyptians knew way more about geo-polymers than we do. How to mix water with the proper ingredients in the proper proportions and the chemical reactions involved - to make man-made stone.

Same in Ancient Peru.
Although they did it a bit differently.
download.jpeg
All those in the pic were poured into place. Due to the bulges it kinda looks like they used some sort of tightly-woven fabric or plant-based forms instead of wood?
 
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mimsey borogrove

Well-known member
I'm a killjoy.

This explanation puts ten thousand past, present and future authors out of work and kills the cottage industry of pyramid books, TV shows and movies. Well, it wont put them out of work they'll still write nonsense - but it'll show how absurd it all is.

No Aliens.
No lasers.
No sonic cutting tools.
No "advanced" technology, alien or ancient Egyptian.
No levitation of gigantic blocks from the quarry xx miles away.
No armies of slaves hauling gigantic blocks. On rollers or otherwise.
No floating of gigantic blocks on barges.
No huge earthen ramps to haul gigantic blocks up higher as the pyramid was built.
No gigantic blocks at all.

Ok, ready?
Here's the big secret.

It was a pour.
It's man-made "cement" poured into simple wooden forms. Maybe better described as man-made rock. Pour the stone, let it dry. Next!

Sorry.
No need for all the ridiculous far-fetched explanations. Occam's Razor and all that. Sure kills the mystery.... and paperback book sales, lol.

The only advanced technology involved is that the Ancient Egyptians knew way more about geo-polymers than we do. How to mix water with the proper ingredients in the proper proportions and the chemical reactions involved - to make man-made stone.

Same in Ancient Peru.
Although they did it a bit differently.
View attachment 10801
All those in the pic were poured into place. Due to the bulges it kinda looks like they used some sort of tightly-woven fabric or plant-based forms instead of wood?
That is a theory others have proposed, however it has problems, such as the knobs. They appear both in Peru and Egypt.




Perhaps it's because they thought rocks were feminine?

But, back to moving large blocks - the limestone blocks on the giza pyramids contain sea shells, so they were quarried. The 70 ton lintels in the kings chamber are granite. The quarry they came from is up the Nile a few hundred miles. Like this obelisk, they dull your Occam's Razor:





 
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mimsey borogrove

Well-known member
frustrating isn't it? on the surface, you would think past civilizations had some pretty good reasons to build things to last thousands of years, but where did they go? If you subscribe to the ancient astronaut theory... where'd they go? If you chalk it up to solar flares on a very long schedule...
and, if that's coming up next week, that will never play in the news media, so most will be caught with their pants down and a few will try hiding in bunkers and eventually make it back to hunting and gathering.
the simulation theory is looking better to me all the time. time is not how we apparently experience it, history is not chronological, events are randomly generated. A little like the current state of World of Warcraft. If it is like an MMORPG, it will suck when the next patch comes out and you have to level a new character that is more OP than your stupid rogue or paladin.
Here's my best guess... always play a mage. You can always switch from frost to fire to arcane, depending on the wind direction, and you can always teleport somewhere safe in just a few seconds. I'm goin' with that, because the alternate explanations that seem more plausible suggest that Dante was right about everything.
Actually, Robert Monroe discusses non linear reincarnation, so your next life could happen prior to this one. Who knows, maybe I am you in a different incarnation?

1619445378491.png
 

Lee #28

Well-known member
Well......L Ron Hubbard thought and taught that Egypt was an Alien Space Invader run operation......

He makes numerous references to Egypt on several tapes that I had listened to in the past....

I believe he called them the "Fifth Invader Force..."

He talks about them having "ray guns...." and thick electrical cables running underground... and robot bodies....

One interesting statement L Ron Hubbard made about Egypt that I remember ...... on another tape...

He claimed that there was a sealed Sarcophagus..., in a ship on its way to Princeton...for research... at the beginning of WWII.

But that the "theta universe" could not allow that to happen because there was a Robot Body inside the sarcophagus....and not a mummy. So Germany sunk that ship.....

I kinda remember that he said is was the Lusitania..... But that doesn't make sense...as it was traveling from New York to England....and not toward America. But perhaps he did....and he was just an idiot.
 
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Chuck J.

INTJ
That is a theory others have proposed, however it has problems, such as the knobs. They appear both in Peru and Egypt.




Perhaps it's because they thought rocks were feminine?

But, back to moving large blocks - the limestone blocks on the giza pyramids contain sea shells, so they were quarried. The 70 ton lintels in the kings chamber are granite. The quarry they came from is up the Nile a few hundred miles. Like this obelisk, they dull your Occam's Razor:





Seriously?

The forms were obviously failing at those points.
 

mimsey borogrove

Well-known member
"Seriously?" Yep. One theory holds that they used bags and filed them with a matrix or mix. However, forms don't fail at exact locations. They fail at the weakest point, so why would they fail so consistently? Perhaps they were designed to make the nodes at those locations?

"Inca masonry of important monuments are well known for the perfect joining of differently shaped stones. Polygonal stones have often convex, pillow-like faces and sunken joints, with edge angles typically in excess of 90°. The Inca builders seem to have enjoyed the effect of irregularity and the play of shadow and light on their walls. But there is also no doubt that such dovetailed stonewalls much better resisted earthquakes"

But, let's delve a little deeper:

"Inca masonry is also famous for the manufacturing and transport of stone blocks of up to more than 100 tons. The Inca walls sometimes give the impression that the stones have been handled with unexplainable transport and rock softening techniques, which already gave rise to unconventional interpretations. However J. Protzen (Protzen, 1986, 1993) made a careful experimental study and came to the conclusion that the technology for dressing and transporting stones was not very sophisticated. Most jobs were carried out with stone hammers of quartzite and of different size and a lot of patience. On well dressed stones larger pit scars are found in the interior of the faces and small ones towards the rim. According to experimental studies the Inca occasionally also used polishing techniques. However they were not applied on the faces, but in the joints to improve the fitting. Apparently flat stones were used in linear and rotating movement using a slurry of water and soil rich in clay. (Protzen & Nair, 1997, 2000). It has been suggested, that in new built walls the upper stone faces were initially left uncut. New stones were then carved on their bedding face and one lateral faces. The shape of these faces were then cut out on the already set stone which was then fit into the generated concave depressions. The required threedimensional contours were pounded out and adapted by hammering via many trials. Footprints of stones that once occupied the spot can be recognized on dismantled Inca walls (see below).

"However fitting a large stone into an irregular stone gap is nevertheless a major challenge and an interesting technique has been suggested using templates (Andrea, 2002). Another explanation was, that the masons suspended the second boulder on scaffolding next to the first one and traced the shape of the first onto it.

"Inca walls are typically inclined inwards by 3°-5°, which makes them, together with their indented and interfacially matched stone pattern highly stable and earthquake resistant. Many stones show pecks or percussion marks, coarser in the centre of the face, finer at the rim and junction with the neighbouring stone. They confirm the experimentally supported strategy of shaping stones by pounding them with increasingly smaller hammer-stones (Protzen, 1986, 1993).

and:

"The Inca builders used different rock materials. The rock mineral quality, which the Inca worked for the fabrication of their walls varied from location to location depending on the availability of suitable stone quarries. The softest stone used was limestone (CaCO3). It was, for example applied for the foundations of the Sacsayhuaman fortress, but not for the impressing facades (fig. 2), which were of andesite, igneous stones obtained from a quarry 35 km distant. Andesite, an in the region abundant and excellent volcanic rock was frequently used by Inca builders. It contains 57-63% quartz (SiO2) besides of a mixture of Na- and Ca-Feldspars (NaAlSi3O8, CaAl2Si2O8) and additional minerals. It was, for example also used in Cusco and Raqchi. The Diorites (magmatic origin), which have also been used by Inca builders, are largely equivalent with Andesite (volcanic origin), but were formed slower and show larger crystals. The wall with the famous stone with 12 edges in Cusco belonging to the Palace of Inca Roqa was constructed with Diorite.

"Granite, as it was used in Machu Picchu (fig. 1), also contains mainly quartz and K-Feldspar (KAlSi3O8) with some additional minerals. Rhyolite (porphyry) is the volcanic equivalent of granite and has smaller crystals. It has been mainly used by Inca builders for the construction of Ollantaytambo (fig. 3) besides of Andesit and Diorite."

"All together it can be said that the rock minerals which the Inca builders used for their most prominent walls were of magmatic and volcanic origin and their composition is characterized by a high content of feldspars and quartz.

More at the paper found at this link:




These are more likely cast in the manner you posit:
1619486183903.png
This video discusses them.

 
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Barile

Active member
Actually, Robert Monroe discusses non linear reincarnation, so your next life could happen prior to this one. Who knows, maybe I am you in a different incarnation?

View attachment 10802
Malkovich?

There may certainly be multiple explanations for all the various anomalies. I tend to agree with Graham Hancock and his theory
discussed here
yes, I realize how he makes his sheckles, but I think he is honestly asking the right questions...

There are things I am loathe to discuss for fear of being labled "unscientific", but suffice it to say, I feel I've observed phenomena that are convincing enough to suspect man had greater 'spiritual' power, if you will, early on. I'd also suspect that anyone else who might have observed such phenomena, might have been driven entirely mad trying to get a handle on it, and repeatedly replicate it, ya know what I'm suggesting.
See what I did there?
 

mimsey borogrove

Well-known member
Ah - I went exterior before I ever heard of Scientology when I was in college - pre drugs FYI and pre-Scientology to boot. Also had recalled a previous life when I was in high school before I'd ever heard of re-incarnation. But, hey - it bugs people who haven't had the experience. So I have learned to mostly shut up on the subject of exteriorization.

Monroe's concept was that you could reincarnate prior to this life as well as in the future. I don't recall if he understood our fate is predetermined or not. If it weren't...

It would be quite a mess if in your next life you reincarnated as John Wilkes Boothe, and didn't shoot Lincoln. The whole future would re-jig itself, and what we knew as history now would turn into an alternate prior universe. And! Just the other day someone was discussing there was a infinite # of alternate universes.

And that could meld with the Holographic Universe concept quite easily - that proports the universe is a shared concept, which lends itself to fluidity.

Fun stuff to consider when you step out of Hubbard's world view, huh?

While I like some of Graham's theories, such as mankind is suffering from mass amnesia, I tried to listen to his last book, but it was all Me, Me, Me, I did that, I did this, etc. which bugged me. I liked Fingerprints of the Gods better.

Mimsey
 

Barile

Active member
Yes, I think there is probably a lot of "better just shut up about this" going on here, or at least a little bit. I did survive the 60's and lived in Greenwich Village at a time when you could easily obtain the most unimaginable pyschedelics at any coffee shop, but the only lasting experience for me was a near death experience, on one fateful trip, which permanently changed my view and opened the doors to possiblities that would haunt me for my entire life, not in a bad way... but still...

I exteriorized again on my first OT-TR0 experience on a comm course in Florida, and as I recall, I was able to navigate the room in a timeless state. This of course was one of the things that made me want to explore further, as it replicated parts of the NDE. Looking back at it, I only wish I'd had a more complete vocabularly of such things, read a few more books by the landmark philsophers... and had a little more life experience than a 17 year old, but I guess ya take what you can get while you can, right? Interestingly, there seems to always be a "take away" with NDE's as reported. In my case, it involved language and perhaps the point of view one assumes when experiencing language. It got me thinking.
I knew early on the problems with scio, but I wanted to understand where that mind had gone to see if there were any harmonic similarities to what I knew in my core. As time went on, it became clear to me, that what started out as a search for an explanation to an experience for one man, had been wrapped up years earlier, and it was running on fumes. That is not to say that I did not have tangible experiences that verge on
what some would call "supernatural". In fact I did and made a point of demonstrating those oddities to people I knew could keep their mouth shut. See, that's why I don't discuss this shit, not just because it makes me sound quite dellusional, but really because it tends to sound like I attribute that to scio, when in fact, I don't. If you stop reading here, my advice, meditate often, drink water, and don't take any shit from the "experts".

I became fascintated with remote viewing within the last 15 or so years and that opens other doors. If you can get through the poor journalism,
and have not heard of or read "The PK Man", it is a taste of those other doors. PK is wrapped up in the questions I have about some of these ancient anomalies. It may very well be the answer to some. It does not explain everything, but it suggests that the ability to traverse time and apparent distance are well within human boundaries. The problem is always, the first success, yields a considerable amount of terror within one's
noodle, perhaps not in the odd case of Ted Owens, as documented by J. Mishlove.

So you see why I keep a lid on this, but I'm willing to bet, I'm not the only one here that's gotten thrown out of a casino for "wtf is this guy reading the cards or what?"

Ya... those fucking pyramids...
 

mimsey borogrove

Well-known member
Yes, I think there is probably a lot of "better just shut up about this" going on here, or at least a little bit. I did survive the 60's and lived in Greenwich Village at a time when you could easily obtain the most unimaginable pyschedelics at any coffee shop, but the only lasting experience for me was a near death experience, on one fateful trip, which permanently changed my view and opened the doors to possiblities that would haunt me for my entire life, not in a bad way... but still...

I exteriorized again on my first OT-TR0 experience on a comm course in Florida, and as I recall, I was able to navigate the room in a timeless state. This of course was one of the things that made me want to explore further, as it replicated parts of the NDE. Looking back at it, I only wish I'd had a more complete vocabularly of such things, read a few more books by the landmark philsophers... and had a little more life experience than a 17 year old, but I guess ya take what you can get while you can, right? Interestingly, there seems to always be a "take away" with NDE's as reported. In my case, it involved language and perhaps the point of view one assumes when experiencing language. It got me thinking.
I knew early on the problems with scio, but I wanted to understand where that mind had gone to see if there were any harmonic similarities to what I knew in my core. As time went on, it became clear to me, that what started out as a search for an explanation to an experience for one man, had been wrapped up years earlier, and it was running on fumes. That is not to say that I did not have tangible experiences that verge on
what some would call "supernatural". In fact I did and made a point of demonstrating those oddities to people I knew could keep their mouth shut. See, that's why I don't discuss this shit, not just because it makes me sound quite dellusional, but really because it tends to sound like I attribute that to scio, when in fact, I don't. If you stop reading here, my advice, meditate often, drink water, and don't take any shit from the "experts".

I became fascintated with remote viewing within the last 15 or so years and that opens other doors. If you can get through the poor journalism,
and have not heard of or read "The PK Man", it is a taste of those other doors. PK is wrapped up in the questions I have about some of these ancient anomalies. It may very well be the answer to some. It does not explain everything, but it suggests that the ability to traverse time and apparent distance are well within human boundaries. The problem is always, the first success, yields a considerable amount of terror within one's
noodle, perhaps not in the odd case of Ted Owens, as documented by J. Mishlove.

So you see why I keep a lid on this, but I'm willing to bet, I'm not the only one here that's gotten thrown out of a casino for "wtf is this guy reading the cards or what?"

Ya... those fucking pyramids...
Remote viewing - did you ever read any of Russell Targ's books, see his videos? On his web site he has an esp app.
 

Barile

Active member
Indeed. I'd never met Mr. Targ ( he was not associated with scio ), but I was working in the HGC at CC in the very early 70's when Ingo Swann and Hal Puthoff were in for auditing on a very regular basis while they were doing the SRI experiments. Pat Price was also around quite a bit, but he spent most of his time at AO, as I recall. I got to meet Ingo at that time, but never had any interaction with Hal, who was more "the scientist". Ingo was an artist by trade and I was always a musician, so there was a common basis. As for Mr. Targ, he does not respond to me, as I had explained to him ( via email ) my association with scio, and if you really want to be ignored, just mention that. Enough said.
From what I know about Targ, he was a Blavatsky fan and member of the Theosophical Society early on.
My introduction to such things was pre-scio at the town of Cassadaga, Florida about 1970. At that time, most of the residents were very old and probably first or second generation members of the George Colby group of spiritualists. I'd met a very elderly couple there one day while
randomly looking for a "psychic reading" door sign. The gentleman was sitting on his porch, painting a nature scene, while his wife was finishing off a reading for someone else. We chatted most pleasantly while he painted away and he mentioned that he had worked for Bell Telephone and claimed to have invented the rotary dialing mechanism for the early telephones. To this day, I think he was quite honest about that, he was certainly the most vibrant and coherent 90 year old I've ever met. When his wife came out onto the porch, she looked at me for a few seconds and said to come on in. We sat at their kitchen table and within a few seconds she said she was not going to do a reading, and would take no money from me, but instead, she was going to teach me how to read. I would spend many Saturdays there, driving down from Gainesville, to sit with her while she showed me how to enter "trance" ( a still mind, if you will ) and read. That was my intro. There was refreshingly, no religious overtone,
no requirement of belief, no suspension of disbelief. She was the real deal, as were many of the residents of that generation. Over the decades,
from what I've read, it seems to have become a tourist destination. Entropy, I would say.
So, remote viewing... check. The thing you don't hear that much about is remote influence, RI. It is a thing, and that info is most likely above top secret, or so it would seem, as it get's not much in the way of mentions. RI, would be in the same ballpark as PK, which is why I mentioned the Ted Owens story, an extreme outlier. It would be easy to dismiss that account, as it was written by a parapsychologist ( "I thought you said sex with a goat." ). I painstakingly researched every reported incident in the book, and there is only one I could not verify, which involves a death on NASA property, so not surprising there is no paper trail.
But all this is off topic. Ya, those pyramids... perhaps thousands of elephants? Randomly naturally occuring structures? Optical illusion?
David Fucking Blaine?
 
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